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Published Plan and Annual Report 2016-2017

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PART I: 2016-17 PUBLISHED PLAN

MINISTRY OVERVIEW

MANDATE

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services envisions an Ontario where all children and youth have the best opportunity to succeed and reach their full potential.

MCYS works with a broad spectrum of partners so that every child and young person in Ontario has access to the right supports and opportunities needed to make positive choices, reach their full potential and seamlessly transition to adulthood.

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MINISTRY CONTRIBUTION TO PRIORITIES AND RESULTS

Ontario is home to almost three million children and youth aged 0 to 18 years, with over 140,000 born in the province each year. Created just over a decade ago, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services works to improve the lives and futures of our most vulnerable children and youth.

Since its inception, the ministry has achieved significant decreases in the youth crime rate, fewer children coming into child protection services and more children finding safe, loving and permanent homes. The Ministry is also redesigning services and systems to increase accessibility for families.

In March 2014, the ministry released its renewed strategic plan, called Growing. Together. (2013-18). This vision focuses on the priorities that matter most for Ontario’s young people and their families through four renewed goals:

To implement its strategic plan, the ministry is undertaking a number of large-scale transformations to modernize service delivery in child welfare, special needs services, child and youth mental health, and child and youth residential services. This work complements the transformations the ministry has already completed, such as in youth justice.

This will make the system more nimble, more streamlined and more accessible to the changing needs of children and youth, and for families to get the appropriate help they need and when they need it for their loved ones. Parents and children should only need to tell their story once.

Our strategies are evidence-based and focused on increasing the effectiveness and sustainability of services, while working collaboratively across government.

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HIGHLIGHTS OF 2015-16 ACHIEVEMENTS

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ALIGNMENT OF PROGRAMS WITH THE GOVERNMENT’S PRIORITIES

The key results achieved support the ministry’s mandate and align with the government’s broader priorities.

The chart below outlines key government priorities that the ministry’s latest projects and transformations are directly supporting:

Government Priority Ministry of Child and Youth Responsibilities
A. A Healthier Population
  1. Child and Youth Mental Health
  2. Services and Supports for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
  3. Children’s Rehabilitation Services
  4. Special Needs Strategy
    1. Coordinated Service Planning
    2. Integrated Delivery of Rehabilitation Services
    3. Respite Services
    4. Regional Service Resolution
    5. Transition Planning
  5. Healthy Babies Healthy Children
  6. Early Years Community Support
B. Towards a Fair Society
  1. Child Protection Services
  2. Child and Youth Residential Services Reform
  3. Youth Leaving Care
  4. Services and Supports for Indigenous Children and Youth
  5. Ontario Youth Action Plan
  6. Collective Impact for Disconnected Youth
  7. Ontario Child Benefit and Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent
C. Strengthened Public Safety and Security
  1. Youth Justice Services
D. Modernized Infrastructure and Transportation Networks
  1. Infrastructure Program
  2. Infrastructure – Youth Justice

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MINISTRY PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES

  1. A HEALTHIER POPULATION
    1. Child and Youth Mental Health

      Approximately one in five young Ontarians experience a mental health challenge. The Moving on Mental Health plan is working to ensure that youth and their families can easily navigate and find core mental health services as close to home as possible for a range of conditions, such as depression, behavioral problems or anxiety.

      These local services will be planned and coordinated by 33 community-based child and youth mental health lead agencies, who are also responsible for collaborating with schools, hospitals and child welfare authorities to improve access to needed supports and services.

    2. Services and Supports for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

      Beginning in 2016-17, the ministry is investing $333 million over five years to improve and expand autism services so that more children and youth receive critical interventions sooner and services are better matched to their needs.

    3. Children’s Rehabilitation Services

      The ministry funds 20 children’s treatment centres, which provide core rehabilitation services in local communities, including physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech-language therapy. These Centres served more than 74,000 children and youth with special needs in 2014-15 across Ontario. Children’s Treatment Centres offer a variety of other services and clinics depending on local needs and the mix of other providers in each community.

    4. Special Needs Strategy

      The ministry is working with other ministries and local communities to implement the Special Needs Strategy, which will help young Ontarians with a range of needs, such as autism, physical and developmental disabilities, rehabilitation, and hearing and vision challenges, to connect with the services they need as early as possible.

      This will be achieved through a new preschool developmental screen for earlier identification of developmental concerns, coordinated service planning, and integrated delivery of rehabilitation services. The goal is to make the experience more accessible and seamless for families.

      1. Developmental Screening Process

        A developmental screening tool assessing a range of developmental domains is being developed to support parents and service providers to understand children’s development and, when needed, support early identification and connection to appropriate intervention services.

      2. Coordinated Service Planning

        A new process for children and youth with multiple and/or complex special needs will mean families will have a trusted partner to help them connect with the right services and supports and develop one coordinated service plan for each child and youth. This service plan takes into account all of their goals, strengths, needs, as well as the services that the child and youth is and will be receiving, without having to unnecessarily repeat their stories.

      3. Integrated Rehabilitation Services

        The integrated delivery of rehabilitation services will mean that children who need occupational therapy, physiotherapy and/or speech and language services will experience seamless service delivery from birth through to school exit, including as they transition into school from preschool services.

      4. Regional Service Resolution

        The ministry is making improvements to service resolution for children and youth with multiple and/or complex special needs and their families. For families, over time, these changes will lead to a transparent service resolution process with accountable decision-making that is easily understood and available when families need it. This will lead to better service experiences for families and better outcomes for children and youth.

      5. Transition Planning

        An integrated transition plan for young people with developmental disabilities supports young people as they move into adulthood and search for work, further education and engagement with their community. This process involves parents, service providers and schools.

    5. Healthy Babies Healthy Children

      The Healthy Babies and Healthy Children program supports healthy child development by screening pregnant women, offering information on healthy child development and parenting to families with newborns and providing home visit intervention to at-risk families.

    6. Early Years Community Support

      The ministry supports healthy child development through a number of programs providing screening, assessment and intervention services to children, youth and their families

  2. TOWARDS A FAIR SOCIETY
    1. Child Protection Services

      All children deserve to grow up in safe, stable and caring environments. In cases where abuse or neglect are suspected and/or verified, children and youth in Ontario are supported by 38 Children’s Aid Societies (CASs), and nine Indigenous child well-being organizations.

      The ministry provides funds to these societies to investigate child abuse, provide protection services and alternate living arrangements, and facilitate adoptions. The ultimate goal of these services is to prevent abuse and neglect, create permanent, stable homes and help prepare these young people for future success.

      The ministry continues to implement the Strategy to Further Transform Ontario’s Child Welfare System, which aims to move the child welfare system towards long-term sustainability, improve outcomes and the experiences of children and youth receiving services and strengthen the accountability of CASs and Indigenous child well-being organizations.

      As part of that work, the ministry announced the Permanency, Adoption and Stability Strategy in September 2015 to make it easier for children and youth in the care of CASs to find forever families, while providing more support to adoptive parents.

      The ministry has also required CASs and Indigenous child well-being organizations to develop and implement a Quality Improvement Plan (QIP) to address non-compliance with the directives and standards for child welfare. Progress will be reviewed on a quarterly basis.

      Implementation also continues for the Child Protection Information Network (CPIN), a multi-year initiative to implement a common information system for all CASs across the province. To date, five CASs are live on CPIN with six more CASs scheduled to go live by summer 2016. The remaining CASs will be onboarded to CPIN through a phased approach, with full implementations by 2019-20.

    2. Child and Youth Residential Services

      Residential care for children and youth in Ontario is delivered by a diverse mix of service providers, including ministry direct-operated, transfer payment operated, private non-profit and for-profit operators. Residential services account for approximately $1 billion across multiple program areas. Children and youth may come into residential care, for a number of reasons, including:

      • Through a Children’s Aid Society due to protection concerns
      • As a result of a court order for youth in conflict with the law
      • As a result of developmental and physical challenges, medical conditions, behavioural difficulties, mental health, psychiatric disorders and/or substance abuse problems, with parental consent

      To understand how better to serve children and youth in residential care, the ministry convened a panel of experts in July 2015 to undertake a review.

    3. Youth Leaving Care

      The ministry is continuing to work with Children’s Aid Societies and community partners to provide support and resources for youth leaving care. These resources include: youth-in-transition workers to help youth make a smooth transition to independent living and adulthood; grants to attend postsecondary education and training; and aftercare benefits for prescriptions, dental and extended health benefits.

    4. Services and Supports for Indigenous Children and Youth

      Indigenous children and youth are one of the fastest growing populations and face a number of unique challenges, from poverty to overrepresentation in the child welfare and youth justice systems.

      Through the Aboriginal Children and Youth Strategy, the ministry is working with Indigenous partners to support the unique needs of Indigenous children, youth and families in Ontario.

      Indigenous children and youth deserve to grow up healthy, happy, resilient, grounded in their cultures and languages, and thriving as individuals and as members of their families, communities and nations.

      Programs under the umbrella of the Strategy include the Aboriginal Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program, Aboriginal Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Child Nutrition Program, Indigenous Child Well-Being Services and prevention initiatives, Akwe:go and Wasa-Nabin Urban Aboriginal Programs, and community-based programs for Indigenous youth in, or at risk of, conflict with the law.

      Ontario is also committed to a Long-Term Strategy to End Violence against Indigenous Women, promoting wellness and family supports to address the impacts of violence on Indigenous families. The multi-ministry strategy is supported by an investment of $100 million over three years, starting in 2016-17, including a commitment of $80 million over three years for a Family Well-Being Program. This program will support families who need additional support, with culturally appropriate care in communities across the province with the aim of the number of Indigenous children and youth in care.

    5. Ontario Youth Action Plan

      This $55 million plan is designed to address the root causes of youth violence, continues to roll out new and expanded programs to support at-risk youth and high needs communities. In total, Ontario will provide 65,000 opportunities per year to at-risk youth.

      As of February 2016, more than 20 agencies have been selected to provide three programs: the Gang Prevention/Intervention program; the Restorative Justice and Conflict Mediation program; and the Stop Now and Plan (SNAP) Middle Years program. Additional programs and agencies will be announced in 2016-17.

    6. Collective Impact for Disconnected Youth

      The ministry is exploring new ways to address complex social problems by piloting a collective impact approach to improve outcomes for youth not in employment, education or training.

      Collective impact is the commitment to solving a specific social problem using a structured form of collaboration by groups from different sectors, such as business, not-for-profits and government.

    7. Ontario Child Benefit and Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

      The Ontario Child Benefit helps families with the cost of raising children under the age of 18 years. In 2015-16, payments increased to a maximum of $1,336 per child, per year. The benefit program helps about one million children, in more than 500,000 low- to moderate-income families.

      The Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent (OCBE) payments are provided directly to Children’s Aid Societies to provide children and youth in care, or in formal Customary Care, with increased educational, recreational, cultural and social opportunities, and with a savings program for older youth in care to: improve their educational outcomes; build their resilience, and enable them to transition smoothly to adulthood.

      The OCBE program provided supports to 10,950 children and youth in care and in formal Customary Care in 2014-15. Approximately 6,800 eligible youth aged 15-17 years participated in the OCBE savings program in the same year.

  3. STRENGTHENED PUBLIC SAFETY AND SECURITY
    1. Youth Justice Services

      The ministry provides programs and services to youth (aged 12 to 17 years at the time of the offence), who are in, or at risk of, conflict with the law. Ontario’s youth justice system provides a continuum of evidence-informed community and custodial programs that are aligned with the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA). Programs and services are intended to:

      • Reduce youth re-offending
      • Contribute to community safety
      • Prevent youth crime
      • Support rehabilitation and reintegration

      In addition, the ministry is taking a comprehensive approach to the collection and use of data to define and measure the impact of youth justice services.

  4. MODERNIZED INFRASTRUCTURE
    1. Infrastructure Program

      The ministry’s 2016-17 infrastructure plan is focused on developing program specific infrastructure investment plans and using limited infrastructure funding available to make strategic investments in infrastructure that enables ministry program outcomes.

      Investments help children's treatment centres, Children’s Aid Societies and youth centres provide safe and comfortable environments for the children and families who rely on their services.

      MCYS will continue to develop an asset management plan with a focus on enabling business transformation and better outcomes, sustaining and enhancing service delivery capacity, and demonstrating effective stewardship of public assets.

    2. Infrastructure Program – Youth Justice Services

      As a result of the Ministry’s youth justice transformation the need for detention/custody services in Ontario has dramatically declined. Consequently the Province is repurposing the Roy McMurtry Youth Centre, an underused youth justice facility, to meet the unique environmental and programming needs of adult female offenders, including those who require specialized mental health services. The facility will be transferred to the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services, and the government will be constructing smaller, strategically located and program appropriate facilities to effectively and efficiently support the programming needs of youth in conflict with the law.

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INVESTING IN ONTARIO’S FUTURE

Our young people are Ontario’s greatest resource. To build Ontario’s economy, its people and communities must succeed. The ministry is working with its partners to build up our young people to secure the future for all Ontarians.

A few key investments are listed below.

Ministry Planned Expenditures 2016-17 ($M)
Operating $4,218.5
Capital $127.6
TOTAL $4,346.1

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DETAILED FINANCIAL INFORMATION


MINISTRY OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES - Operating and Capital Summary by Vote
Votes/Programs Estimates
2016-17
$
Change from Estimates
2015-16
$
% Estimates
2015-16 *
$
Interim Actuals
2015-16 *
$
Actuals
2014-15 *
$
OPERATING EXPENSE
Ministry Administration 13,679,400 (344,600) (2.5) 14,024,000 14,024,000 11,686,022
Children and Youth Services 4,299,832,000 22,342,700 0.5 4,277,489,300 4,249,424,900 4,144,394,310
Less: Special Warrants - - - - - -
Total Operating Expense to be Voted 4,313,511,400 21,998,100 0.5 4,291,513,300 4,263,448,900 4,156,080,332
Special Warrants

Statutory Appropriations
-

65,014
-

1,000
-

1.6
-

64,014
-

64,014
-

99,183
Ministry Total Operating Expense 4,313,576,414 21,999,100 0.5 4,291,577,314 4,263,512,914 4,156,179,515
Consolidation & Other Adjustments

Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments
(95,115,000)



4,218,461,414
6,446,000



28,445,100
-



0.7
(101,561,000)



4,190,016,314
(101,532,000)



4,161,980,914
(105,107,099)



4,051,072,416
OPERATING ASSETS
Children and Youth Services 3,000 (200,000) (98.5) 203,000 203,000 -
Less: Special Warrants - - - - - -
Total Operating Assets to be Voted 3,000 (200,000) (98.5) 203,000 203,000 -
Special Warrants

Statutory Appropriations
-

-
-

-
-

-
-

-
-

-
-

-
Ministry Total Operating Assets 3,000 (200,000) (98.5) 203,000 203,000 -
CAPITAL EXPENSE
Children and Youth Services 1,000 - - 1,000 1,000 -
Infrastructure Program 118,858,800 (55,044,200) (31.7) 173,903,000 159,539,100 52,629,463
Less: Special Warrants - - - - - -
Total Capital Expense to be Voted 118,859,800 (55,044,200) (31.7) 173,904,000 159,540,100 52,629,463
Special Warrants

Statutory Appropriations
-

10,322,700
-

(802,400)
-

(7.2)
-

11,125,100
-

10,323,700
-

10,322,653
Ministry Total Capital Expense 129,182,500 (55,846,600) (30.2) 185,029,100 169,863,800 62,952,116
Consolidation & Other Adjustments

Total Including Consolidation & Other Adjustments
(1,570,000)



127,612,500
77,210,400



21,363,800
-



20.1
(78,780,400)



106,248,700
(74,246,500)



95,617,300
(2,395,824)



60,556,292
CAPITAL ASSETS
Children and Youth Services 1,368,500 (7,111,700) (83.9) 8,480,200 - 3,373
Infrastructure Program 4,253,800 (11,064,000) (72.2) 15,317,800 15,317,800 -
Less: Special Warrants - - - - - -
Total Capital Assets to be Voted 5,622,300 (18,175,700) (76.4) 23,798,000 15,317,800 3,373
Special Warrants - - - - - -
Statutory Appropriations - - - - - -
Ministry Total Capital Assets 5,622,300 (18,175,700) (76.4) 23,798,000 15,317,800 3,373
Ministry Total Operating and Capital Including Consolidation and Other Adjustments (not including Assets) 4,346,073,914 49,808,900 1.2 4,296,265,014 4,257,598,214 4,111,628,708

* Estimates, Interim Actuals and Actuals for prior fiscal years are re-stated to reflect any changes in ministry organization and/or program structure. Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2016 Ontario Budget.


Operating and Capital Expenditure Estimates by Vote
Children and Youth Services 97.0%
Infrastructure Program 2.7%
Ministry Administration 0.3%

Total Ministry Operating Expense by Vote
Children and Youth Services 99.7%
Ministry Administration 0.3%

Total Ministry Captial Expense by Vote
Infrastructure Program 92.0%
Children and Youth Services 8.0%

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APPENDIX: 2015-16 ANNUAL REPORT

2015-16 ACHIEVEMENTS

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services was created to support the young people of Ontario to thrive and succeed. Our commitment is to protect, nurture and support children and youth as they grow — from birth, through childhood, adolescence and into adulthood. The ministry is accountable for the delivery and/or oversight of a range of programs and services.

The mandate of the ministry is twofold. The first is to work with, and through, our many partners to establish a system of services and supports that strengthen families and help Ontario’s most vulnerable children and youth overcome barriers to their success and wellbeing. The second is to lead across government on issues that affect all children and youth.

Since its creation, the ministry has developed considerable expertise in the area of child and youth development. This focus on positive development informs our role as a champion and catalyst for the outcomes of all children and youth in Ontario. The ministry actively shares that expertise and works in partnership to create opportunities for the voices of children and youth to be heard across government.

Healthy Child Development

Preschool Speech and Language (number of children in active service)
  2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
# of children 36,086 36,716 39,476 43,384 47,583 51,572 51,557 51,977 54,455 56,605 58,863 58,031 56,090

*Note: 2015-16 data is service actual as of March 10, 2016, year-end data not available until May 2016


Infant Hearing Program (number of newborns screened)
  2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
# of newborns screened 105,641 123,068 127,659 132,100 136,894 121,860 122,278 130,826 135,958 134,910 131,773 132,287 114,962

*Note: 2015-16 data is service actual as of March 10, 2016, year-end data not available until May 2016


Blind Low Vision (number of children receiving intervention)
  2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
# of children receiving intervention 374 645 727 816 850 858 863 859 818

*Note: 2015-16 data is service actual as of March 10, 2016, year-end data not available until May 2016


Healthy Babies Healthy Children (number of women screened postpartum)
  2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
# of women screened postpartum 117,839 120,306 121,978 124,126 123,994 124,985 123,119 119,140 116,787 110,058 110,281 110,593 102,846

*Note: 2015-16 data is service actual as of March 10, 2016, year-end data not available until May 2016


Infant Development (number of children served)
  2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
# of children served 11,574 12,429 12,630 12,798 13,640 13,001 13,146 13,481 13,464 13,660 12,558

*Note: 2015-16 data is service actual as of March 10, 2016, year-end data not available until May 2016


Child Welfare

Number of Adoptions Completed for Every 100 Children in Care
  2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 Forecast
# of Adoptions Completed for Every 100 Children in Care 50.2 4.35 4.49 4.40 4.46 5.46 5.48 4.74 4.85 5.93 5.52 6.09

*Note: 2015-16 data is service actual as of March 10, 2016, year-end data not available until May 2016


Youth At Risk

Youth In Policing Initiative - Job Placements
  2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
# Job placements for YIPI - Summer 105 159 161 311 369 383 381 370 379 388
# Job placements for YIPI - After-school - - - - - - 232 270 251 -

*Note 2015-16 numbers for the After School program are not yet available


Jobs for Youth Program - Job Placements
  2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
# Job placements for JFY - Summer 807 1,806 1,739 4,052 4,916 4,521 4,203 4,612 4,055 4,631
# Job placements for JFY - After-school - - - - - - - 530 530 530

Youth Crime Rate and Youth Violent Crime Rate (2003 - 2014)
  2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Youth Crime Rate 5,934 5,947 5,804 5,932 5,922 5,604 5,428 4,915 4,438 4,090 3,372 3,201
Youth Violent Crime Rate 1,686 1,790 1,795 1,796 1,805 1,736 1,641 1,563 1,507 1,378 1,180 1,048

Number of Youth Opportunities in Ontario (2012 - 2014)
  2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
# of Youth Opportunities in Ontario 21,757 29,314 51,165

Note: Includes opportunities provided under the YOF, YOW, YIPI, U for Change and Studio Y programs.


Indigenous Children and Youth

Mental Health

Special Needs, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Autism

Annual Autism Funding for IBI/ABA ($M)
  2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
AIP/IBI 49.82 61.39 74.54 96.08 110.56 114.55 117.04 115.79 115.38 118.87 120.51
ABA - - - - - - - 24.81 24.97 25.00 25.00

Notes: 2004-5 – 2010-11 numbers reflect IBI services only; ABA services commenced midway through 2011-12; 2011-12 – 2014-15 numbers reflect IBI and ABA


IBI/ABA Clients Served
  2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16
IBI 675 795 1,125 1,404 1,306 1,428 1,437 1,418 1,409 1,460 1,453 1,465
ABA (services began in 2011-12) - - - - - - - 4,072 8,882 8,445 8,572 8,811

Notes: 2004-5 – 2010-11 numbers reflect IBI services only; ABA services commenced midway through 2011-12; 2011-12 – 2015-16 numbers reflect IBI and ABA; 2015-16 numbers are forecasts for fiscal year end


Child Poverty

Infrastructure Program

Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures 2015-16
  Ministry Interim Actual Expenditures ($M) 2015-16 *
Operating $4,162.0
Capital $95.6
Staff Strength **
(as of February 29, 2016)
2,063.2

* Interim actuals reflect the numbers presented in the 2016 Ontario Budget.
** Ontario Public Service Full-Time Equivalent positions.

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