Results-based Plan Briefing Book 2010-11

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Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
The Estimates, 2010-11

Table of Contents

RESULTS-BASED PLAN 2010-11

Ministry Overview

APPENDIX I: ANNUAL REPORT 2009-10

Results-based Plan 2010-11

Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
The Estimates, 2010-11

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
Overview

Introduction

Ontario is home to more than 2.8 million children and youth. This highly diverse and talented group of young people are the key to Ontario’s future success and prosperity. They all deserve the opportunity to realize their full potential and become active, productive members of our community. The Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) is committed to improving how services are provided to Ontario’s young people and their families by focusing on improving outcomes and a better service experience.

The majority of ministry funding flows through agencies to provide services on behalf of the government. The ministry also directly operates nine facilities (seven in the youth justice system and two child and youth mental health centres) as well as 64 probation offices across Ontario.

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services funds and/or provides:

Ministry Vision

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services’ vision is an Ontario where all children and youth have the best opportunity to succeed and reach their full potential.

Ministry Mandate

The ministry works with community partners, other ministries, agencies, and municipalities to fund or provide:

In 2010-11, the ministry’s key priorities include:

Ministry Programs and Services: Summary

The following programs and services are delivered through the Ministry of Children and Youth Services:

Early Learning and Child Development

Children and Youth at Risk

Specialized Services

Ontario Child Benefit

Key Activities

Early Learning and Child Development

Child Care and Early Learning

The ministry supports licensed child care programs that provide safe, nurturing environments that support early learning and child development. It licenses and inspects child care programs in approximately 4,600 child care centres and 140 private-home day care agencies.

The ministry provides child care subsidies for families. Eligibility for financial assistance is based on net family income. For example, a family with a net income below $20,000 can receive full child care assistance. A family receiving financial child care assistance with a net income of $40,000 will pay approximately $8 per day. Parents can apply for assistance through their municipality for children up to age 12.

Working with community partners, the ministry supports 24 Best Start neighbourhood hubs where families can find services such as child care, drop-in centres, public health programs, speech and language therapy and mental health services.

On January 12, 2010, Ontario announced the phase one sites for full-day early learning for four- and five-year olds. Up to 35,000 children in almost 600 schools across the province will begin full-day learning in September 2010. The Ministries of Children and Youth Services and Education are working collaboratively with municipalities, school boards and child care operators to ensure a smooth transition to full-day learning, while maintaining stable, high-quality child care and early years programs across the province.

In 2010-11, the ministry will proceed with capital investments to help child care centres affected by the implementation of the new full-day learning program in local communities across the province. As four- and five-year olds move from the child care system to full-day learning, child care spaces will be retrofitted to serve younger children and to ensure that operators will remain viable.

MCYS will invest $859.2 million in child care and early learning in 2010-11.

Healthy Babies Healthy Children

The ministry continues to support a number of early screening programs. These programs promote healthy child development, identify risks in young children and connect families with appropriate services. Healthy Babies Healthy Children (HBHC) provides screening by a public health nurse for pregnant women and every new baby and mother. It is a prevention, early identification and intervention program available to all families with children from the prenatal period until age 6, who are identified as at risk.

As of October 1, 2009, all 18-month-old children in Ontario can receive an enhanced well-baby visit as part of regular care. In addition to the regular health check-up at 18 months, the enhanced visit now includes a discussion between health professionals and parents on child development, parenting and local community programs that promote healthy child development and early learning. It also provides an opportunity to identify children who may require referral to additional health or developmental services.

MCYS will invest $86.5 million in Healthy Babies Healthy Children in 2010-11.

Early Years Community Support

The ministry has several targeted programs that provide individual assessment and intervention support for young children. These include:

The ministry also supports early learning and child development including 103 main Ontario Early Years Centres along with satellite centres. These centres offer free learning programs and parenting workshops for children, parents and caregivers. In 2008-09, Ontario Early Years Centres served almost 260,000 children and 230 parents and caregivers.

Together with volunteers and community partners, Ontario’s Student Nutrition Program provides financial support to communities to provide nutritious meals and snacks in schools and community agencies. Prior to 2008, the government provided annual funding of $8.5 million to support approximately 3,000 meal and snack programs. As part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, the ministry announced an increase to the investment in the Student Nutrition Program of $9.4 million, bringing the total annual allocation to $17.9 million. Ontario’s Student Nutrition Program provides over 500,000 children and youth with healthy breakfasts and snacks so they are better prepared to learn in the classroom.

In 2010-11, MCYS will invest $177.7 million in Early Years Community Support including $17.9 million for the Student Nutrition Program.

Children and Youth at Risk

Child Protection Services

Ontario’s child protection services help children and youth who have been or are at risk of being abused or neglected grow up in safe, stable, caring environments and reach their full potential. The mandate for child protection is delegated to 53 children’s aid societies (CASs) across the province, six of which are Aboriginal CASs. Five Aboriginal CASs serve Northern Ontario Aboriginal children and youth and one serves Toronto.

Ontario’s 53 children’s aid societies are mandated by the Child and Family Services Act to:

The ministry provides children’s aid societies with practice standards and tools to assess the risk to a child’s safety and match their response to the needs of the child and family. An emphasis is placed on permanency planning for children and youth and resolving child protection cases outside the courtroom through alternative dispute resolution.

To better serve children and families, the government created a standardized complaint process for all CASs and established the Child and Family Services Review Board as an independent tribunal to review certain complaints related to CASs and certain decisions of CASs and adoption licensees.

The ministry is committed to working with CASs to make Ontario’s child protection system sustainable and to invest in ways that result in the best outcomes for kids. In November 2009 the Minister established the Commission to Promote Sustainable Child Welfare. The Commission is working with children’s aid societies and the government to achieve a stable financial future for child welfare in Ontario. The Commission is working with CASs and the ministry to identify better ways to do business, while protecting and supporting children and youth.

In 2010-11, MCYS will invest more than $1.4 billion in Child Protection Services.

Child and Family Services Act Review

In 2010, the ministry conducted a mandatory review of the Child and Family Services Act (CFSA) through public engagement with parents, clients, stakeholders and service providers. This review, required by legislation every five years, will help inform improvements to the Act so that agencies can work more effectively and achieve better outcomes for vulnerable children and youth.

One focus of the review was an examination of CAS compliance with their obligations under the Act when providing services to Aboriginal children and youth. Information from the review will assist the ministry to work with children’s aid societies, Aboriginal service agencies, First Nations governments and Aboriginal communities to support and protect Aboriginal children and youth.

Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption

In August 2009, the Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption, appointed by an Order-in-Council in 2008, released a report with recommendations to help people who are trying to start or expand a family. The 11-member panel recommended ways to help make fertility treatment and adoption more accessible and affordable, including: a provincial adoption agency, a review of current legislation, and post-adoption subsidies and supports for families, and funding for fertility screening and treatment. The panel included adoptive parents, people who have had personal experience with infertility, and representatives from the community and adoption providers.

Child Poverty

Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy, Breaking the Cycle, is a long-term strategy focused on improving opportunities for Ontario's children and their families. The strategy includes indicators to measure progress and sets a target of reducing the number of children living in poverty by 25 per cent over five years by improving their success in school and supporting low-income families.

An important milestone was the passage in May 2009 of the Poverty Reduction Act, 2009, legislation that requires the government to conduct regular consultations on the strategy, to measure its success at least every five years, and to report annually on its progress. Most important, the act makes poverty reduction a priority in Ontario for generations to come.

Measuring progress and communicating results to Ontarians is a critically important part of the strategy. The ministry released the first Annual Report on Breaking the Cycle on December 2, 2009. Baseline data required to measure progress of the strategy is expected to be complete in 2010. The second Annual Report, scheduled for release in December 2010, will describe identifiable trends and report on the government’s progress toward reaching the 25 in 5 target.

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) is a non-taxable financial benefit that reaches over one million Ontario children each month. A centrepiece of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, the OCB gives low-income families the financial support they need to provide essentials like food and shelter for their children and is making it easier for parents to leave social assistance for work. To be considered for the benefit, individuals need to file their annual income taxes and register their children for the Canada Child Tax Benefit.

In July 2009, the OCB increased, two years ahead of schedule, to a maximum of $1,100 per child per year or almost $92 per child per month. Through the Poverty Reduction Strategy, the government committed to increasing the maximum annual OCB payment to $1,310 per child by 2013.

MCYS will invest $908.8 million in OCB in 2010-11.

Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

In 2010-11, the ministry will invest $17.3 million in funding equivalent to the Ontario Child Benefit to children’s aid societies to provide children and youth in care or formal customary care with increased access to recreational, educational, cultural and social opportunities, and for savings for older youth to assist in their transition to independent living.

Youth Policy Framework

The Review of the Roots of Youth Violence report, released in 2008, called on the government to develop a plan to better align youth-serving programs across all levels of government and across all sectors. In 2010, the ministry will engage youth and youth organizations from across the province in the development of a Youth Policy Framework, a plan for an integrated, coordinated system of services so that all youth are supported to reach their full potential.

Child and Youth Mental Health

Mental health services for children and youth are delivered through over 260 child and youth mental health and community service agencies. The ministry also directly operates two mental health facilities: the Thistletown Regional Centre in Etobicoke and the Child and Parent Resource Institute in London.

Specific key services funded by the ministry include:

The ministry is leading the implementation of A Shared Responsibility: Ontario’s Policy Framework for Child and Youth Mental Health. Together with community partners, the ministry conducted a comprehensive mapping exercise to get a clear picture of the mental health landscape: what programs are being delivered where and by whom.

Over the next several years, the ministry will use this information to work with the ministries of Education and Health and Long-term Care to develop a more coordinated, collaborative, responsive and sustainable system of mental health services for children and youth.

In 2010-11 MCYS will invest $527.9 million in child and youth mental health services including early identification and intervention, intake and assessment, counselling, individual, group and family treatment, parent education, supports including respite and directly operated facilities.

Youth Justice Services

The goal of youth justice services is to improve outcomes for youth through a continuum of evidence-based programs and build strong partnerships with youth, families and communities to reduce re-offending rates. In keeping with the Youth Criminal Justice Act, the ministry provides, or funds, community and custodial programs for youth in conflict or at risk of conflict with the law. The act focuses on prevention, diversion, rehabilitation, addressing the underlying causes of youth crime, and reserving custody for serious and violent offences.

Passed in February 2009, the Child and Family Services Statute Law Amendment Act, 2008 created a single, youth-focused, legislative framework governing custody, detention and community programs for youth in conflict with the law aged 12 to 17 at the time of an offence. As of April 2009, all youth who were in units co-located at an adult correctional facility were re-located to dedicated youth custody facilities.

Since the proclamation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in April 2003, there has been a decline in custody sentences and more emphasis on alternatives to custody programs in the community. In response to this trend, the ministry has reduced the number of beds in the open custody sector and has reinvested those savings in a broad continuum of community-based alternatives to custody and community interventions.

Youth in secure custody/detention or open custody/detention facilities take part in structured programs, including education and skill development, substance abuse counselling, anger management, life skills, recreation and cultural programs. Approximately 754 youth can be accommodated in Ontario’s 21 secure custody/detention facilities and approximately 513 in 49 open custody/detention facilities. Probation staff provide case management services to approximately 11,000 youth to help them meet their rehabilitative goals and adopt pro-social values and behaviours.

Youth Opportunities Strategy

The Youth Opportunities Strategy (YOS) gives disadvantaged youth and youth in priority communities valuable work experience that will contribute to their future success and build a strong workforce for Ontario. YOS is a key part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy.

Ontario is investing more than $24 million this year in the Youth Opportunities Strategy. This includes support for participating employers and local police services to provide fully subsidized summer jobs for disadvantaged youth. This year’s investment includes some support from the federal government. The Youth Opportunities Strategy includes:

This summer, more than 4,600 youth in 26 Ontario communities will get the chance to gain valuable work experience. The program is delivered by local agencies that match youth with local employers, while participating police services recruit youth who are interested in a career in policing.

In 2010-11, MCYS will invest over $360.1 million in youth justice services, which includes the Youth Opportunities Strategy and directly-operated facilities.

Residential Services

Children and youth may come into residential care through a court order for child protection or as a result of being in conflict with the law. Other children may require residential care due to developmental or physical conditions, behavioural difficulties, psychiatric disorders or substance abuse. Residential care is provided in either group or foster care settings. Some residential services offer specialized treatments and therapeutic programs while others provide care and support to children and youth at risk.

The ministry licenses and provides funding for approximately:

New policy standards were introduced in 2008-09 to improve the safety and security of licensed residential settings for children and youth. These new standards were designed to improve the competency of licence applicants, strengthen screening and criminal reference checks for persons in contact with vulnerable children and youth, improve food and nutrition standards and enhance the cultural competency of services within licensed residential settings.

In an effort to ensure the safe administration of psychotropic medications to children and youth living in licensed residential settings, the ministry is developing new requirements for licensed residential settings and new information materials about the administration of psychotropic medication for children, youth and their caregivers. The ministry is also working with the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies to incorporate information about the Health Care Consent Act and informed consent into the training for children’s services workers.

The ministry continues to support better training and tools for licensing staff to promote greater consistency in licensing and compliance. Amendments to the Child and Family Services Act (CFSA) allow the director to impose or amend terms and conditions on a residential licence at any time during the licensing period, allowing the director to respond to compliance issues as they arise.

Specialized Services

Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

Children’s Treatment Centres across Ontario provide core rehabilitation services including physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech and language services to children with physical and/or developmental disabilities, chronic illness and/or communication disorders, and their families. A variety of other services and clinics are offered depending on local needs and the mix of other providers in each community. The 20 MCYS-funded Children’s Treatment Centres served approximately 58,500 children in 2008-09.

Through respite services, the ministry helps provide temporary relief to family caregivers of children and youth with special needs. Respite services can also provide children and youth with special needs with the opportunity to participate in meaningful activities that promote the development of skills and relationships. Services are provided in the family home or in a setting outside the home such as in a group home.

In March 2010, the ministry announced an additional $9 million in funding for children’s treatment centres across the province. An additional one-time investment of $2.5 million in 2010-11 will help 12 treatment centres improve their clinical information systems.

In 2010-11, MCYS will invest $111.8 million for Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services.

Services and Supports for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Ontario supports specialized services and supports for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and their families. Since July 2005, children with a diagnosis considered to be towards the severe end of the autism spectrum have been eligible to receive intensive behavioural intervention (IBI) services delivered through the Autism Intervention Program (AIP) regardless of their age. To address the growing demand for these services, the ministry has been working with parents, experts and service providers to plan a broader range of services and supports to meet the needs of children/youth with ASD.

Over the next year, the government will broaden and expand the range of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA)-based services and supports available in the community and the publicly-funded school system. These supports include behaviour management and skills development programs offered in ways that provide children and youth with ASD and their families with the right supports to address a variety of needs at the right time.

Intensive behavioural intervention (IBI) is effective for many children with ASD. The government will continue to support IBI services delivered through the Autism Intervention Program.

The ministry is working to promote consistency and transparency in clinical decision-making and the assessment process for IBI services delivered through the AIP.

Through a partnership between the Ministry of Children and Youth Services and the Ministry of Education, Connections for Students transition teams will be available in all publicly-funded school boards. These multidisciplinary transition teams are helping to improve the transition for children leaving intensive behavioural intervention (IBI) services delivered through the AIP to start or continue in the publicly-funded school system.

Ontario continues to provide training regarding ASD and applied behaviour analysis for principals, teachers and education assistants to help support more than 10,000 students with ASD in Ontario’s publicly-funded school system. Twelve Ontario colleges offer the Graduate Certificate Program in Autism and Behavioural Science. More than 573 students have already graduated from this program and enrolment in 2009-10 grew to more than 399 students. This will continue to increase the pool of qualified therapists to work in the Autism Intervention Program, the education sector and other children’s agencies.

The ministry also offers respite support and services for families of children and youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Each year, at least 3,250 families are able to receive respite services to provide temporary relief from the demands of caring for a child with ASD. As well, at least 800 children/youth with ASD each year have an opportunity to attend summer camps through the MCYS ASD Summer Camps initiative. During summer camp and respite programs, children/youth with ASD learn new skills and make new friends.

MCYS will invest $186.6 million in services for children and youth with ASD in 2010-11.

Capital Investments in Social Service Facilities

Through the Ministries of Community and Social Services and Children and Youth Services, the government is investing $50 million in nearly 1,000 projects across the province that will help local non-profit social service agencies better serve low income and vulnerable Ontarians, including children, youth and families, while creating jobs in local communities. These projects will include expansions and renovations that will improve security, accessibility and energy efficiency at eligible social service facilities. Work on these projects started in early 2010 and will be completed by March 31, 2011.

Investing in infrastructure is a critical part of Ontario’s plan to restore growth, save and create jobs in the short term, and build foundations for the future.

Delivering the Ministry’s Programs and Services

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services programs and services are delivered in four ways:

  1. Through directly-operated facilities and probation offices
    The ministry directly operates 64 probation offices and seven secure custody/detention youth centres, including three recently constructed youth justice facilities. These dedicated youth facilities are responsive to the unique needs of youth in conflict with the law. The ministry also directly operates two child and youth mental health centres: Thistletown Regional Centre in Etobicoke and the Child and Parent Resource Institute in London.
  2. Through community-based service agencies
    In 2009-10, the ministry provided funding to approximately 1,200 community-based agencies that partner with the government to deliver program and services. These services are delivered through 53 children’s aid societies, over 260 children’s mental health and community service agencies, 36 public health units, 20 children’s treatment centres, and 203 youth justice agencies. Service contracts between the ministry and the service provider establish accountability requirements. These contracts detail the ministry’s funding, budgetary and financial reporting requirements, program deliverables and outcomes, service volumes, legislative requirements and any additional ministry standards and requirements.
  3. Through municipalities
    Consolidated Municipal Service Managers and District Social Services Administration Boards manage programs funded by ministries. They are responsible for managing the delivery of Ontario’s child care services.
  4. Through direct financial support to families
    The Ontario Child Benefit, respite funding for families with children with autism, and the Direct Funding Option offered within the Autism Intervention Program are examples of support provided directly to families.
Ministry Contribution to Key Priorities & Results
Priorities Better Ontario For Families Healthier Ontario Smarter Ontario Stronger Ontario
Key Results
  • More children arriving in Grade 1 ready to learn
  • More children screened for risk factors, identified earlier
  • Increase in adoptions
  • More children and youth whose families need assistance benefit from the Ontario Child Benefit.
  • More children getting a healthy breakfast or snack
  • More children are screened for risk factors and identified earlier
  • More children receiving supports for special needs
  • Improved function after mental health care
  • More children arriving in Grade 1 ready to learn
  • More at-risk youth successful in school
  • More youth graduating from secondary school
  • More opportunities for youth at risk
  • Fewer youth entering justice system and reduction in re-offending rates
Strategies

Support for low-income families; screening programs and support for at-risk families; early learning and child development programs; access to services for children and youth with special needs including autism and mental health issues; nutrition programs; stability for children in need of protection.

Screening programs and support for at-risk families; early learning and child development programs; increased access to services for children and youth with special needs and mental health issues; nutrition programs.

Support for low-income families; programs for at-risk youth and youth in conflict with the law; early learning and child development programs; nutrition programs; focus on permanency for children in care; increased access to services for children and youth with special needs and mental health issues.

Programs for at-risk youth and youth in conflict with the law; support for low-income families; increased support for families with children with special needs and mental health issues.

Major Activities

Ontario Child Benefit

Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

Early Learning and Child Development

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs and services

Child protection services

Ontario Child Benefit

Early Learning and Child Development

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Student Nutrition Program

Mental health programs and services

Enhanced Screening at 18 months

Ontario Child Benefit

Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

Early Learning and Child Development

Youth Opportunities Strategy

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs & services

Child protection services

Ontario Child Benefit

Youth Opportunities Strategy

Youth Justice Services

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs and services

Youth Policy Framework

Ministry Contribution to Priorities & Results

The ministry’s initiatives support the government’s priorities of a healthier Ontario, a smarter Ontario, a stronger Ontario and a better Ontario for families. With its community partners, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services is developing and tracking outcomes for children and youth to help the ministry determine how programs are working and if young people are getting the services that they need.

Early Learning and Child Development

Child Care and Early Learning

Since 2004, Ontario has created more than 22,000 new licensed child care spaces, including over 300 spaces for Aboriginal children living off-reserve. In 2008-09, there was an increase of 9,537 licensed child care spaces for a total of 266,285 spaces.

Performance Measure: Growth in licensed child care spaces

Growth in child care spaces bar graph

Targets are not appropriate for this measure as MCYS funds are locally directed

Healthy Babies Healthy Children

Healthy Babies Healthy Children provides screening for pregnant women and every new baby and mother. It is designed to help families promote healthy child development and help their children reach their full potential. In 2008-09 the program provided prenatal screening to 26,600 pregnant women and screened 125,000 live births to identify risk factors.

Performance Measure: Number of children screened at birth through Healthy Babies Healthy Children

Children screened at birth through Healthy Babies Healthy Children bar graph

*2008 result previously reported as 96.9% - year-end adjustments have since been applied.

Early Years Community Support

Preschool Speech and Language identifies children with speech and language disorders as early as possible and provides these children with services to enable them to develop communication and early literacy skills so they are ready to learn when they start school. In 2008-09, the program provided service to 52,295 children, up 14 percent since 2003-04.

The Infant Hearing Program provides newborn hearing screening in hospitals and community settings, audiology assessment and hearing aid selection, monitoring for babies born at risk of early childhood hearing loss and services to support language development in infants and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In 2008-09, the program provided hearing screening for 121,860 newborns, which is 93 percent of all live births in Ontario.

Children and Youth At Risk

Child Protection Services

The ministry is working with Ontario’s 53 children’s aid societies and community partners to make the child protection system more accountable, flexible and responsive to the needs of children, youth and their families. Changes to the Child and Family Services Act since 2006 have created more permanency options for children and youth in care. These changes make it easier for relatives or community members to provide permanent homes for children and youth. They also allow more children to be adopted, while still maintaining ties to their birth family and to their community.

Performance Measure: Number of completed children’s aid society adoptions.

Children’s aid society adoptions bar graph

* The ministry is currently developing a new performance target for child welfare adoptions that reflects an increased emphasis on permanency as part of Child Welfare Transformation.

Child and Youth Mental Health

The ministry invested $522.2 million in 2009-10, which included directly operated facilities, to provide mental health services to children and youth in Ontario. Through this funding, the government is building on its previous investments in more than 260 child and youth mental health agencies and 17 hospital-based outpatient programs.

By continuing to reduce overlap and delays within the system, Ontario is committed to reducing wait times for children and youth requiring mental health services, while also improving outcomes for those who access these services.

Performance Measure: Percentage of children and youth showing improved functioning at exit from Child and Youth Mental Health Services

Children and youth showing improved functioning at exit from Child and Youth Mental Health Services bar graph

Performance Measure: Average wait time from referral to receipt of "regular ongoing" child and youth mental health services

Average wait time from referral to receipt of regular ongoing child and youth mental health services bar graph

Youth Justice Services

Evidence indicates that a broad range of community-based and custodial programs and services can reduce re-offending. Demonstrating a commitment to evidence-based programs and services, the ministry established a permanent Effective Programming and Evaluation Unit. The unit is involved with a comprehensive review of the research literature, consultations with academics, experts and stakeholders, and strategies for training, monitoring and evaluating programs and services across the sector. This unit will ensure that evidence-based practices guide and inform the delivery of youth justice services.

Some examples of activities that support effective programming include;

In 2008-09 the average daily population for the system was 12,221 including 11,509 youth under community supervision, 234 in open custody/detention and 478 youth in secure custody/detention.

Performance Measure: Number of youth who re-offend as a percentage of all youth tracked

youth who re-offend as a percentage of all youth tracked

* Changes in the re-offending rates of youth on probation may be reflecting major systemic changes related to the implementation of the YCJA in 2003 which significantly restricted the use of custodial sentences in favour of community-based sanctions.

Youth Justice Services: New Facilities

The secure custody/detention system has been transformed into a dedicated youth justice system to meet the needs of youth who were 12 to 17 at the time of the offence. A key component of this transformation includes the government’s emphasis on effective programming based on research into what works best with youth.

In 2008-09, the ministry opened new youth justice facilities in Fort Frances, Sault Ste. Marie and Thunder Bay and completed and opened an expansion of a facility in Ottawa. A new facility in Brampton, the Roy McMurtry Youth Centre, which serves up to 192 youth, began accepting youth in July 2009.

The Fort Frances facility, the first secure custody facility for Aboriginal youth in Canada, serves up to 12 Aboriginal youth from northwestern Ontario and is operated by an Aboriginal organization. The Sault Ste. Marie facility and Thunder Bay facilities each serve up to 16 youth and the expanded Ottawa facility serves up to 40 youth.

Youth Opportunities Strategy

In 2009-10, disadvantaged youth and youth from priority communities received summer employment experience and year-round support from youth outreach workers and the school-based prevention/diversion programs. In 2009-10, a total of 4,377 of summer jobs across 26 priority communities were provided through the Strategy. The data for 2009-10 includes:

Youthconnect.ca provides information and resources to young people across Ontario and information about programs like Summer Jobs for Youth. In 2009, the website received over 225,000 visitors.

The Youth Opportunities Strategy gives disadvantaged youth and youth in priority communities valuable work experience that will contribute to their future success and build a strong workforce for Ontario. The strategy is a key part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. In 2009-10, more than $21 million was invested in the program, nearly double the previous year’s investment. The federal government supported this year’s expansion.

Performance Measure: Expanded summer job and training opportunities for vulnerable youth

Expanded summer job and training opportunities for vulnerable youth

Specialized Services

Autism Spectrum Disorder

The number of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders receiving Intensive Behavioural Intervention has increased from 531 in 2003 to 1,306 in 2008-09.

Ontario has more than tripled autism spending from $44 million to $158 million in five years and more than doubled the number of children receiving Intensive Behavioural Intervention in the same time period. As well, the government responded to calls for transparency and consistency in decisions related to access to IBI therapy by establishing one expert panel to develop clinical practice guidelines and another to establish benchmarks.

Performance Measure: Autism Intervention Program – Number of children receiving IBI

Number of children receiving IBI

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) gives low-income families financial support that they need to provide for their children. The OCB helps build a stronger economy by making it easier for parents to leave social assistance for work. In July 2007, eligible families received a one-time OCB down payment of up to $250 for each dependant child under age 18 and in July 2008, monthly payments began. In July 2009, the OCB increased to a maximum annual payment of $1,100 per child, or almost $92 per child, per month – two years ahead of schedule.

Organization Chart

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Organization chart

Cost Sharing with the Federal Government

Independent of block funding received by the province under the Canada Social Transfer (CST) for Early Childhood Development (ECD) and Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC), the province receives federal funding under the following cost-sharing agreements:

For the 2010-11 fiscal year, federal contributions are estimated at:

  Cash Accrual
Indian Welfare Services Agreement    
Child Care $10,000,000 $11,000,000
Children and Youth at Risk $96,300,000 $104,400,000
 
Subtotal $106,300,000 $115,400,000
Agreement re: Youth Justice Services    
Youth Justice Services $112,790,000 $64,934,000
Subtotal $112,790,000 $64,934,000
Total $219,090,000 $180,334,000

Statutes Administered by the Ministry

Agencies, Boards and Commissions

  2010-11
Estimates
2009-10
Interim Actuals
2008-09
Actuals
Child and Family Services Review Board (CFSRB) 778,900 1,812,750 2,050,594
Custody Review Board (CRB) 94,000 49,768 24,880

Figures for CFSRB and CRB include salaries and wages, benefits and other direct operating expenditures.

The Child and Family Services Review Board is a tribunal with authority to review matters:

The Custody Review Board hears applications and makes recommendations to Provincial Directors who perform duties under the Youth Criminal Justice Act and the Child and Family Services Act with respect to youth in conflict with the law. The young person may apply to the Board for a review of a director’s decision respecting the following matters:

The CFSRB and CRB are administratively integrated with a common Board Chair. The Boards operate at arms-length from government and its decisions are not subject to review by a government minister or ministry official.

Ministry Financial Information

Table 1: Ministry Planned Expenditures 2010-11

  Ministry Planned Expenditures ($M) 2010-11
Operating $4,743.7
Infrastructure $15.7
BPS Consolidation ($92.1)
Total including Consolidation $4,667.3

Table 2: Overall Summary (Operating and Capital)

Votes/Programs Estimates
2010-11
Change from Estimates
2009-10
Estimates
2009-10
Interim Actuals
2009-10
Actuals
2008-09*
$ $ % $ $ $
OPERATING AND CAPITAL            
Ministry Administration 13,206,000 1,575,800 13.5% 11,630,200 11,229,385 12,588,359
Children and Youth Services 4,730,451,200 260,332,600 5.8% 4,470,118,600 4,499,543,275 4,020,962,716
Infrastructure 15,507,000 7,097,000 84.4% 8,410,000 14,532,513 128,006,092
Total Including Special Warrants 4,759,164,200 269,005,400 6.0% 4,490,158,800 4,525,305,173 4,161,557,167
Less: Special Warrants 0 0 - 0 0 0
Total to be Voted 4,759,164,200 269,005,400 6.0% 4,490,158,800 4,525,305,173 4,161,557,167
Special Warrants 0 0 - 0 0 0
Statutory Appropriations 252,314 164,300 186.7% 88,014 110,553 65,968
Ministry Total Operating and Capital 4,759,416,514 269,169,700 6.0% 4,490,246,814 4,525,415,726 4,161,623,135
Consolidation (92,100,000) (8,400,000) 10.0% (83,700,000) (95,100,077) (92,701,083)
Ministry Total Operating and Capital including Consolidation 4,667,316,514 260,769,700 5.9% 4,406,546,814 4,430,315,649 4,068,922,052

Assets (Operating and Capital)

Votes/Programs Estimates
2010-11
Change from Estimates
2009-10
Estimates
2009-10
Interim Actuals
2009-10
Actuals
2008-09
$ $ % $ $ $
Children and Youth Services 4,369,000 1,629,000 59.5% 2,740,000 323,522 0
Total Ministry Assets 4,369,000 1,629,000 59.5% 2,740,000 323,522 0
Less: Special Warrants 0 0 - 0 0 0
Total Assets to be Voted 4,369,000 1,629,000 59.5% 2,740,000 323,522 0

* Amounts have been restated for transfers of funding from Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services.

Appendix I: Annual Report 2009-10

Ministry Achievements in 2009-10

Early Learning and Child Development

Early Learning

On June 15, 2009, Dr. Charles Pascal, Special Advisor to the Premier, presented his report, With Our Best Future in Mind: Implementing Early Learning in Ontario, to the Ontario government. The report includes a comprehensive set of recommendations on how to implement full-day learning for four- and five-year olds.

The province is moving forward with the phased-in implementation of full-day learning, and is working with municipalities and Best Start networks to support local planning for a smooth transition to full-day learning and to maintain stable child care services for families. Up to 35,000 kindergarten students will be enrolled in almost 600 publicly-funded schools, beginning in September 2010, with full implementation in all publicly-funded school boards targeted for 2015-16. As part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, some of the first schools are in high-needs neighbourhoods.

With funding from the federal child care agreement coming to an end in 2010, Ontario was able to step in with a provincial investment of $18 million to provide stability for families with kids in child care through the end of the 2009-10 school year and into the summer. In the 2010 Ontario Budget, the government committed permanent funding to replace the $63.5 million in lost federal funding to continue supporting approximately 8,500 child care spaces.

Healthy Babies Healthy Children and Early Years Community Support

In 2009-10, the ministry continued to support early healthy child development through:

The ministry continued to fund the Student Nutrition Program to help more children and youth ─ especially those in high-needs neighbourhoods ─ get a healthy breakfast so they are ready to learn in school. An annual investment of $17.9 million continues to help provide healthy breakfasts and snacks to more than 500,000 kids across Ontario.

Children and Youth at Risk

Child Protection Services

Ontario’s child protection services help children and youth, who have been or are at risk of being abused or neglected, grow up in safe, stable, caring environments and reach their full potential. Child protection services are delegated to 53 children’s aid societies (CASs) across the province, six of which are Aboriginal CASs. Five Aboriginal CASs serve Northern Ontario Aboriginal children and youth and one serves Toronto.

Ontario’s 53 children’s aid societies are mandated by the Child and Family Services Act to:

In 2009-10, the ministry provided $26.9 million in one-time funding to the CASs with the most immediate financial challenges. This additional funding included an extra $2.5 million for Aboriginal CASs in recognition of the unique challenges facing Aboriginal children and communities. The Commission to Promote Sustainable Child Welfare was established to work with children’s aid societies and the government to identify better ways to do business, while protecting and supporting children and youth.

Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption

In August 2009, the Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption, appointed by an Order-in-Council in 2008, released a report with recommendations to help people who are trying to start or expand a family. The 11-member panel recommended ways to help make fertility treatment and adoption more accessible and affordable, including: a provincial adoption agency, a review of current legislation, and post-adoption subsidies and supports for families, and funding for fertility screening and treatment. The panel included adoptive parents, people who have had personal experience with infertility, and representatives from the community and adoption providers.

Child and Youth Mental Health

The government continues to work to create a mental health system that delivers the right services and supports to children and youth when they need them, as close to home as possible. Mental health services for children and youth are delivered through more than 260 child and youth mental health agencies and 17 hospital-based outpatient programs. First Nations and non-profit Aboriginal organizations and service agencies, including 29 Friendship Centres and one other site. The ministry also directly operates two child and youth mental health facilities: the Thistletown Regional Centre in Etobicoke and the Child and Parent Resource Centre in London.

Aboriginal children and youth in urban and off-reserve communities across Ontario continued to benefit from new and enhanced programs that help them build confidence and make healthy choices. These include the Akwe:go Urban Aboriginal Children’s Program for children ages 7-12 and Wasa-Nabin Urban Aboriginal Youth Program for youth ages 13-18.

The Ontario Child and Youth Telepsychiatry Program continues to provide access to psychiatric consultations for children and youth living in rural, remote and under-serviced communities. The program also provided education and training for professionals working in community based agencies.

In 2006, Ontario released A Shared Responsibility, its first-ever policy framework for child and youth mental health. In 2009, with community partners and the Ministries of Education and Health and Long-Term Care, the ministry completed a comprehensive mapping of all child and youth mental health services across Ontario, a key step in implementing the strategy. Results were released through 22 corporate, regional and community workshops. In January 2010, a customized mapping survey was released to Ontario hospitals. The overall initiative will result in a more co-ordinated, collaborative, responsive and sustainable mental health system for children and youth.

The ministry is working closely with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and other ministries on the development and implementation of a comprehensive, 10-year mental health and addictions strategy, which includes children and youth.

In July, 2009 the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care held a summit called Open Minds, Healthy Minds, to introduce the strategy and hear from stakeholders. The development of the strategy is expected to continue in 2010.

The Provincial Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario continued its efforts to advance knowledge and understanding of mental health disorders in children and youth.

Youth Justice Services

The passage of the Child and Family Services Statute Law Amendment Act on February 18, 2009, and amendments to the general regulation under the Child and Family Services Act (CFSA) that came into effect April 1, 2009, completed the government’s transformation of Ontario’s dedicated youth justice correctional system for youth in conflict with the law, aged 12 to 17, at the time of the offence. A key goal of this transformation is providing youth in conflict with the law with meaningful supports and services, while holding them accountable for their actions, to help steer them away from crime, make better choices and lessen the likelihood they will re-offend. This will make communities safer and give youth a better opportunity to succeed.

As of April 1, 2009, all youth in conflict with the law have been re-located to dedicated youth justice facilities, separate from adult correctional institutions.

The Roy McMurtry Youth Centre, a new 192-bed facility with a strong focus on education and rehabilitation, opened in Brampton in May 2009 and began serving youth in July. The province has also built and opened new secure custody and detention centres ─ in Fort Frances (the Ge-Da-Gi-Binez Youth Centre for Aboriginal youth in conflict with the law), Sault Ste. Marie and Thunder Bay ─ and expanded an existing facility in Ottawa.

The ministry continued to invest in the implementation of the Alternatives to Custody and Community Interventions Strategy, including $2 million for Aboriginal programs. The strategy provides rehabilitation of youth in conflict with the law, while holding them accountable for their actions. During 2009, 40 community-based programs were funded for Aboriginal Children and Youth in, or at risk for, conflict with the law.

The government has moved forward with initiatives related to several key recommendations in the Roots of Youth Violence Report, released in November 2008, which provided important information about the complex and often inter-related roots of youth violence:

Youth Opportunities Strategy

The Youth Opportunities Strategy gives disadvantaged youth and youth in priority communities valuable work experience that will contribute to their future success and build a strong workforce for Ontario. The strategy is a key part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. In 2009-10, the strategy:

Youthconnect.ca, the youth opportunities website, links to government programs like Summer Jobs for Youth and provides information and resources available to young people. In 2009, there were more than 225,000 unique visitors to the site.

Residential Services

Residential services are an integral part of the services for children and youth at risk, and an important resource for families. The government has made real progress in supporting the safety and security of licensed residential service settings for children and youth. For example, to enhance the safe administering of medications in residential settings, it has supported the Provincial Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health in developing a brochure and fact sheet for children, youth and caregivers about psychotropic medications.

Children and youth may come into residential care through a court order for child protection or as a result of being in conflict with the law. Other children may require residential care due to developmental and physical challenges, medically fragile conditions, behavioural difficulties, psychiatric disorders or substance abuse.

Residential care is provided through either group or foster care settings. Some residential services offer specialized treatments and therapeutic programs while others provide care and support to children and youth at risk. The ministry continues to fund more than 5,100 beds in 627 group homes, 12,000 beds in more than 8,200 foster homes, and more than 1,267 licensed beds in 70 youth justice residential settings.

Specialized Services

Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

In 2009-10, the ministry invested $82.1 million for core rehabilitative services in 20 children’s treatment centres.

Children’s Treatment Centres provide rehabilitation services ─ including physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech language services ─ to children and youth up to 19 years of age with physical and/or developmental disabilities, chronic illness and/or communication disorders. The 20 MCYS-funded children’s treatment centres served approximately 58,500 children in 2008-09.

The ministry invested $19.1 million for respite services for families with children who are medically fragile, technology dependent or who have multiple special needs. Services are provided in the family home or in a setting outside the home, such as a group home, and may include meaningful activities for kids that promote the development of skills and relationships.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Services

The ministry invested $156.9 million in 2009-10 to provide services to children and youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families.

In 2008-09, more than 1,300 kids with autism attended 103 day and overnight summer camps across the province and 1,407 children and youth took part in seasonal camps. These camps gave kids with autism a unique learning experience while giving families some much-needed relief from caring for their children day after day.

More than 6,900 families with children with autism benefited from respite services. The ministry’s investment in autism services included $7.8 million in 2009-10 to provide temporary relief to families caring for a child with autism.

The ministry also began discussions with service providers, experts and parents on plans to expand the range of community and school-based supports available to children and youth with ASD.

The ministry worked with the Ministry of Education to implement Connections for Students, which establishes transition teams to support children leaving the Autism Intervention Program and starting or continuing in a publicly-funded school. This initiative was implemented in all publicly-funded school boards by March 2010.

The College Graduate Certificate Program in Autism and Behavioural Science – developed by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services in collaboration with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - continued to increase the pool of qualified professionals to work with children and youth with ASD. More than 573 students have already graduated from this program and enrolment in 2009-10 grew to more than 399 students.

The ministry continued to fund training for resource teachers and home visitors in every region of the province. As of December 2009, approximately 1,100 resource teachers and home visitors had received appropriate training. To complete the training and create sustainability, between October 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010, 230 child care staff and 30 Resource Teachers received training to assist them in working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

The Child and Family Services Act

The Child and Family Services Act is the legislation that governs many of the province's programs and services for children and youth, including child protection, youth justice, adoption of Ontario Crown wards as well as some aspects of child development and child treatment services. The Act also provides for the licensing of children’s residential services and the rights of children while in residential care. In 2009-10, the ministry undertook a review of the Act with two main components:

  1. A review of compliance by children’s aid societies with the Indian and Native1 provisions of the Act.
  2. A review guided by the ministry’s strategic framework and focused on how the legislation and its regulations and policies might be enhanced to better enable outcomes-based service delivery, support an improved service experience for young people, and modernize the Act.

1Indian and Native are terms defined in the CFSA. Indian refers to persons who are registered status Indians or are eligible to be registered as status Indians under the Indian Act. Native persons are persons who are members of a Native community that has been designated as a Native community by the minister.

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) is a non-taxable benefit to help low-income families provide for their children. To be considered for the benefit, individuals need to file their annual income taxes and register their children for the Canada Child Tax Benefit. The OCB reaches over one million kids and their families each month.

As part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, the OCB was accelerated in July 2009, two years ahead of schedule, when low-income families started receiving up to $1,100 per child annually ─ almost double the previous maximum benefit.

The ministry also provides funding ─ equivalent to the maximum OCB ─ to children’s aid societies to provide more educational, cultural and social opportunities for all children and youth in care based on their individual needs. Supports may include tutoring, skills building and recreational programs. Older youth may also be eligible to participate in a savings program to help them prepare for independence and the transition to adulthood.

These youth will have the opportunity to obtain financial skills to help prepare them for independent living and savings to assist with the cost of their basic needs when they leave care.

Poverty Reduction Strategy

Ontario’s first-ever poverty reduction strategy, Breaking the Cycle, was released in December 2008. It set a target of reducing child poverty by 25 per cent over five years, lifting 90,000 children and youth out of poverty.

On May 6, 2009, the Poverty Reduction Act, 2009 passed with unanimous consent. This legislation requires:

Ontario’s first annual report on its Poverty Reduction Strategy was released in December 2009 and highlights the government’s progress, including:

Other Ontario initiatives to help reduce poverty include increasing the minimum wage to $10.25 on March 31, 2010 for the seventh time since 2004, and taking steps to ensure tax fairness for low-income families as part of comprehensive tax reforms. These changes will mean that 90,000 low-income Ontarians will no longer have to pay personal income tax.

  Ministry Interim Expenditures ($M) 2009-10
Operating 4,511
Capital 14
BPS Consolidation (95)
Staff Strength
(as of March 31, 2010)
2,516 Full-time equivalents