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MINISTRY OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES

Annual Accessibility Plan
2012-2013

Table of Contents

Introduction
Section One: Report on Measures to Identify, Remove and Prevent Barriers in 2011-12
Section Two: Measures Planned for 2012-13 and Beyond
Section Three: Review of Acts, Regulations and Policies
Glossary of Terms/Acronyms
For More Information

Introduction

Each year, the Ontario Public Service (OPS) sets a course to prevent, identify and remove barriers for persons with disabilities. Every ministry participates through the preparation of its annual accessibility plans, as required under the Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA).

The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA) is Ontario's roadmap to become accessible by 2025. It includes accessibility standards in:

This year, the accessibility plans must also address the Integrated Accessibility Standard Regulation (IASR) under the AODA, enacted in June 2011. The IASR required the OPS to develop a multi-year accessibility plan (MYAP) to prevent and remove barriers for persons with disabilities. The OPS multi-year accessibility plan was published on January 1, 2012. It included a statement of commitment for the OPS to demonstrate leadership in accessibility, as follows:

The OPS endeavours to demonstrate leadership for accessibility in Ontario. Our goal is to ensure accessibility for our employees and the public we serve in our services, products and facilities.

The 2012-13 Accessibility Plan will continue to advance the Ministry of Children and Youth Services and the OPS toward becoming an accessible province for all Ontarians.

To view every ministry's Accessibility Plan, visit Ontario.ca.

Section One: Report on Measures to Identify, Remove and Prevent Barriers in 2011-12

The Government of Ontario is working to achieve an accessible province by 2025.

Since 2001, the OPS has been complying with the obligations of the ODA to prepare an annual accessibility plan, which is made available to the public through the Government of Ontario's public website.

Since its creation in 2003, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services has been a leader in accessibility. Some notable accomplishments are:

In 2011-12, the government continued to comply with the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service Regulation. As well, it had begun applying initiatives to meet compliance of some of the requirements of the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation in the areas of employment, information and communications, transportation and procurement. The government continues to implement initiatives to enhance accessibility in other areas such as the built environment.

The following is a summary of the accessibility initiatives the Ministry of Children and Youth Services implemented last year, as a result of the 2011-2012 MCYS annual accessibility plan.

Reporting on 2011-2012 AODA Obligations

Customer Service

In 2011-12 the Ministry:

Information and Communications

In 2011-12, the Ministry:

Employment

In 2011-12, the Ministry:

Built Environment

In 2011-12, the Ministry:

Procurement

In 2011-12, the Ministry:

Continued to explore methods of tracking accessibility expenditures in order to meet the requirement of having information to evaluate efficient methods of providing accessible services.

Section Two: Measures Planned for 2012-13 and Beyond

Our Statement of Commitment:

The OPS endeavours to demonstrate leadership for accessibility in Ontario. Our goal is to ensure accessibility for our employees and the public we serve in our services, products and facilities.

This year, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services accessibility plan focuses on six areas. In order to demonstrate leadership in accessibility, our ministry is planning to undertake the activities described below. At a minimum, these initiatives will support compliance with the existing Accessibility Standards for Customer Service and Integrated Accessibility Standards under the AODA.

Customer Service

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is committed to ensuring that people with disabilities receive accessible goods and services from us. This means they will receive goods and services with the same high quality and timeliness as others.

In 2012-2013, the Ministry will:

In 2013-2014 and beyond, the Ministry will implement additional measures, including:

Information and Communications

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is committed to making government information and communications accessible to people with disabilities. The information we provide and how we communicate it, are key to delivering our programs and services to the public.

In 2012-2013, the Ministry will:

In 2013-2014 and beyond, the Ministry will implement the following additional measures:

Employment

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is committed to fair and accessible employment practices that attract and retain talented employees with disabilities. People with disabilities who are OPS employees should be able to participate fully and meaningfully in services and employment.

In 2012-2013, the Ministry will:

In 2013–2014, the Ministry will implement further measures, as follows:

Built Environment

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is committed to greater accessibility in, out of, and around the buildings we use.

In 2012-2013, the Ministry will:

In 2013-2014 and beyond, the Ministry will implement further measures, including:

Procurement

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is committed to integrating accessibility considerations into our procurement processes. We ask potential suppliers to tell us about the accessible options they offer. We include accessibility considerations in our evaluation criteria.

In 2012-2013, the Ministry will:

In 2013-2014 and beyond, the Ministry will implement additional measures, including:

Accessibility Training

Section Three: Review of Acts, Regulations and Policies

In support of our commitment to improve accessibility for people with disabilities, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services will continue to review government initiatives, including legislation and policies, to identify and remove barriers.

Acts, Regulations and Policies Reviewed in 2011-12

Acts and Regulations

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is committed to ensuring that our Acts and regulations are reviewed for potential accessibility barriers.

In 2011-12, the Ministry used the OPS Inclusion Lens to review the British Home Child Day Act, 2011, and the Poverty Reduction Act, 2009.

Acts, Regulations and Policies to Be Reviewed in 2012-13

Acts and Regulations

The OPS Diversity Office and the Ministry of the Attorney General have developed a coordinated approach to continue with the review of government legislation for accessibility barriers. In this next phase, high impact statutes that meet the following criteria will be reviewed:

  1. Statutes that affect persons with disabilities directly;
  2. Statutes that provide for the delivery of widely applicable services or programs;
  3. Statutes that provide benefits or protections; or
  4. Statutes that affect a democratic or civic right or duty.

This phase of the review will be completed by the end of 2014. The government has decided to review these statutes because it is anticipated that changes in these areas will have the highest impact on those Ontarians who have accessibility needs. We will continue to report on the review in our annual accessibility plan.

   

Identifying, Removing and Preventing Barriers with the OPS Inclusion Lens

In 2011, the Ontario Public Service (OPS) launched the OPS Inclusion Lens. The OPS Inclusion Lens is an analytical tool that helps staff incorporate elements of inclusion into their work through an enhanced understanding of diversity and accessibility. The Inclusion Lens can be used when initiating a project or reviewing policies, programs, legislation, guidelines and procedures. The OPS Inclusion Lens can assist in identifying, removing and preventing barriers to accessibility and other dimensions of diversity.

In 2011-12, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services:

In the future, our Ministry will:

Glossary of Terms/Acronyms

AODA – Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005

ASL – American Sign Language

CFLL – Centre for Leadership for Learning

EAP – Employee Accommodation Plan

EMMA – Electronic Manual of Ministry Administration

IASR – Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation

IO – Infrastructure Ontario

MYAP – Multi-Year Accessibility Plan

MCYS - Ministry of Children and Youth Services

OPS – Ontario Public Service

ODA – Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001

PDF - Portable Document Format

TTY - Teletypewriter

WCAG - Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

YJSD – Youth Justice Services Division

For More Information

Questions or comments about the Ministry of Children and Youth Services' accessibility plan are always welcome.

General inquiry number: In Toronto, call 416-325-5666

General inquiry TTY 1-800 number: 1-800-387-5559

E-mail: mcysinfo@ontario.ca

Ministry website address: www.children.gov.on.ca

Visit the Ministry of Community and Social Services Accessibility Ontario web portal. The site promotes accessibility and provides information and resources on how to make Ontario an accessible province for everyone.

Alternate formats of this document are available free upon request from:

ServiceOntario Publications
Phone: 1-800-668-9938
TTS: 1-800-268-7095

© 2012 Queen's Printer for Ontario

ISSN 1911-3994

Ce document est disponible en français.