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Results-based Plan Briefing Book 2009-10

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Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
The Estimates, 2009-10

Table of Contents

Part I: Results-Based Plan 2009-10

Ministry Overview

APPENDIX I: ANNUAL REPORT 2008-09

Part I: Results-based Plan 2009-10


Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
The Estimates, 2009-10

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
Overview

Introduction

Ontario is home to more than 2.8 million children and youth. This highly diverse and talented group of young people are the key to Ontario’s future success and prosperity. They all deserve the opportunity to realize their full potential and become active, productive members of our community. The Ministry of Children and Youth Services is committed to improving how services are provided to Ontario’s young people and their families by focusing on improving outcomes and a better service experience.

The majority of ministry funding flows through agencies to provide services on behalf of the government. The ministry also directly operates 9 facilities (7 in the youth justice system and two child and youth mental health centres) as well as 64 probation offices across Ontario.

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services funds and/or provides:

Ministry Vision

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services’ vision is an Ontario where all children and youth have the best opportunity to succeed and reach their full potential.

Ministry Mandate

The ministry works with community partners, other ministries, agencies, and municipalities to develop policies and programs and provide services that:

In 2009-10, the ministry’s key priorities include supporting:

Ministry Programs and Services: Summary

The following programs and services are delivered through the Ministry of Children and Youth Services:

Early Learning and Child Development

Children and Youth at Risk

Specialized Services

Ontario Child Benefit

Key Activities

Early Learning and Child Development

Child Care and Early Learning

The ministry supports licensed child care programs that provide safe, nurturing environments that support early learning and child development. It licenses and inspects child care programs in approximately 4,600 child care centres and 140 private-home day care agencies.

Ontario has expanded the availability of child care through the creation of more than 22,000 new licensed child care spaces since 2004. To help make high quality child care more affordable, in 2008-09, Ontario provided an additional $23 million in financial assistance (fee subsidies) to help an additional 3,000 children benefit from licensed child care in 2008. Eligibility for the financial assistance is based on net family income. For example, a family with a net income below $20,000 can receive full child care assistance. A family receiving financial child care assistance with a net income of $40,000 will pay approximately $8 per day. Parents can apply for assistance through their municipality for children up to age 12.

In February 2009, Canada’s first self-regulatory College of Early Childhood Educators, created by the province and became fully operational. The College establishes high standards for the profession and brings recognition to the important role early childhood educators play in the lives of Ontario’s children. In 2009-10, the province will continue to strengthen the quality of licensed child care by providing grants to help child care professionals upgrade their qualifications and supporting early childhood educators with easily accessible training and education opportunities.

Working with community partners, the ministry continues to support 24 Best Start neighbourhood hubs where families can find services such as child care, drop-in centres, public health programs, speech and language therapy and mental health services. Families in three demonstration communities, Timiskaming, the rural areas of Lambton and Chatham-Kent and Hamilton’s east end, also receive an enhanced 18 month well-baby check up to help spot early risk factors.

Ontario will invest $868.9 million in child care and early learning in 2009-10.

Healthy Babies Healthy Children

The ministry continues to support a number of early screening programs. These programs promote healthy child development, identify risks in young children and connect families with appropriate services. Healthy Babies Healthy Children offers screening by a public health nurse for new mothers and their babies. It also includes follow-up, assessment and home visiting for high-risk families and children up to age 6.

Ontario will invest $86.5 million in Healthy Babies Healthy Children in 2009-10.

Early Years Community Support

The ministry has several targeted programs that provide individual assessment and intervention support for young children. These include:

The ministry also supports early learning and child development including 103 main Ontario Early Years Centres along with satellite centres. These centres offer free learning programs and parenting workshops for children, parents and caregivers. In 2007-08, Ontario Early Years Centres served almost 260,000 children and 221,000 parents and caregivers.

Together with volunteers and community partners, Ontario’s Student Nutrition Program provides financial support to communities to provide nutritious meals and snacks in schools and community agencies. The program has been enhanced to create or expand programs in communities with the greatest need as part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. The number of children and youth who benefited from student nutrition programs increased by almost 11 per cent in 2007-08 to a total of 431,491 students. In 2008-09, the government provided an additional $32 million over three years to begin or strengthen breakfast and morning meal programs in high-needs communities. This included $3.9 million in one-time grants to buy equipment, non-perishable food and other basic supplies.

In 2008, Ontario appointed an expert panel on infertility treatment and adoption to help find solutions for people who are trying to start or expand a family. The panel will recommend ways to help make both infertility treatment and adoption more accessible and affordable. The panel’s report will be submitted in June 2009.

In 2009-10, Ontario will invest $177.6 million in Early Years Community Support including $17.9 million for the Student Nutrition Program.

Children and Youth at Risk

Child Poverty

Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy is a long-term strategy focused on improving opportunities for Ontario's children. The strategy includes indicators to measure progress and sets a target of reducing the number of children living in poverty by 25 per cent over the next five years.

The strategy is focused on children and youth, with the goal of breaking the cycle of poverty by improving their success in school, supporting families and empowering communities.

Child Protection Services

Ontario’s child protection services help children and youth, who have been or are at risk of being abused or neglected, grow up in safe, stable, caring environments and become successful adults. Child protection services are delegated to 53 children’s aid societies (CASs) across the province. Six of these CASs are designated as Aboriginal CASs. Five northern Aboriginal CASs serve 63 First Nation communities and one serves only urban Native clients.

Ontario’s 53 children’s aid societies have the mandate to:

The ministry provides children’s aid societies with practice standards and tools to assess the risk to a child’s safety and match their response to the needs of the child and family. Greater emphasis is being placed on permanency for children and youth and resolving child protection cases outside the courtroom through alternative dispute resolution.

To better serve children and families, the government has created a standardized complaint process for all CASs and established the Child and Family Services Review Board as the independent tribunal to review certain complaints related to CASs and certain decisions of CASs and adoption licensees.

As part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, the government has a goal of improving educational outcomes and smoothing the transition to adulthood for youth in the child protection system. Ontario has committed to investing in supports that will help youth as they leave care and make the transition to independence. As of 2008-09, the ministry is providing new funding, equivalent to the Ontario Child Benefit, to children’s aid societies to support improved outcomes for children and youth in care and leaving care.

In 2009-10, Ontario will invest more than $1.4 billion in Child Protection Services.

Child and Youth Mental Health

Mental health services for children and youth are delivered through over 260 child and youth mental health and community service agencies including approximately 90 dedicated child and youth mental health centres and 17 hospital-based children and youth mental health outpatient programs. The ministry also directly operates two mental health centres: Thistletown Regional Centre and the Child and Parent Resource Institute.

Specific provincial programs include:

Together with community partners, the ministry is mapping all of the services that are available across Ontario for children and youth with mental health needs. This information will provide the government with a better understanding of what services are available in specific areas of the province. Over the next several years, the ministry will use this information, with the ministries of Education and Health and Long-term Care, to support a more coordinated, collaborative, responsive and sustainable system of mental health services for children and youth.

In 2009-10 Ontario will invest $508.2 million in child and youth mental health services including early identification and intervention, intake and assessment, counselling, individual, group and family treatment, parent education, supports including respite and directly operated facilities.

Youth Justice Services

The goal of youth justice services is to improve outcomes for youth through a continuum of evidence-based programs and build strong partnerships with youth, families and communities to reduce offending. In keeping with the Youth Criminal Justice Act, the ministry provides, or funds, community and custodial programs for youth in conflict or at risk of conflict with the law. The Act focuses on prevention, diversion, rehabilitation, addressing the underlying causes of youth crime, and reserving custody for serious and violent offences.

In 2008-09, the ministry completed the transformation of Ontario’s youth justice system, consistent with the goals of the Youth Criminal Justice Act. In February 2009, Ontario passed the Child and Family Services Statute Law Amendment Act 2008 to create a single, youth-focused, legislative framework governing custody, detention and community programs for youth in conflict with the law aged 12 to 17 at the time of an offence. A key goal of this transformation is reducing the number of youth who re-offend.

As of April 1, 2009, youth in conflict with the law will be located in dedicated youth justice facilities separate from adult correctional institutions. New youth justice facilities were opened in Sault Ste. Marie, Fort Frances and Thunder Bay. The facility in Ottawa was expanded and a new facility in Brampton is scheduled to open in spring 2009.

Youth in secure custody/detention or open custody/detention facilities take part in structured programs, including education and skill development, addiction counselling, anger management, life skills, recreation and cultural programs. About 800 youth can be accommodated in Ontario’s 23 secure custody/detention facilities and about 478 in 49 open custody/detention facilities. Probation staff help youth to meet their goals and stay out of trouble.

Since the Youth Criminal Justice Act came into effect in April 2003, there has been a significant decline in custody sentences and more emphasis on alternatives to custody. In response, the ministry has reduced the number of open custody beds by 496. The latest rationalization of beds was completed on September 30, 2008. These savings have been reinvested in alternatives to custody and community interventions, as well as improving outcomes for youth receiving service in the open custody system. These initiatives include:

The Youth Opportunities Strategy is a comprehensive plan to provide youth from high-needs neighbourhoods with opportunities to reach their full potential. Participating communities include: Toronto, Windsor, Hamilton, London, Thunder Bay and Ottawa with additional programs in Durham region (Youth in Policing and Youth Outreach Worker Program) and communities policed by Nishnawbe-Aski Police Services (Youth in Policing Initiative). In 2008-09, Ontario invested $11 million on the program, which includes:

The government has committed to expanding the program in existing communities and to other priority communities as part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. Over the next three years, Ontario will more than double its support for the Youth Opportunities Strategy, bringing its total investment to over $23 million annually.

The Youth Challenge Fund supports youth-led projects in 13 high needs neighbourhoods in Toronto to promote youth leadership and community engagement. The neighbourhoods include: Crescent Town, Dorset Park, Eglinton East-Kennedy Park, Flemingdon Park –Victoria Village, Jamestown, Jane-Finch, Kingston-Galloway, Lawrence Heights, Malvern, Scarborough Village, Steeles L’Amoureux, Westminster-Branson and Weston-Mount Dennis. Ontario’s investment of $30 million over three years began in 2006-07. In 2009-10, programs created through the fund will continue to support young people.

In 2009-10, Ontario will invest $349.9 million in youth justice services including directly operated facilities.

Residential Services

Children and youth may come into residential care through a court order for child protection or as a result of being in conflict with the law. Other children may require residential care due to developmental or physical conditions, behavioural difficulties, psychiatric disorders or substance abuse. Residential care is provided in either group or foster care settings. Some residential services offer specialized treatments and therapeutic programs while others provide care and support to children and youth at risk.

The ministry licenses and provides funding for approximately:

In 2008-09, new standards were implemented to improve the quality, safety and security of licensed residential settings for children and youth. These new standards are designed to improve the competency of licence applicants, strengthen criminal reference checks, improve food and nutrition standards and enhance the cultural competency of staff working within licensed residential settings.

In February 2009, the ministry released the summary report of the Expert Panel on Standards of Care for the Administration of Psychotropic Medications to Children and Youth Living in Licensed Residential Settings. The ministry is beginning to implement the expert panel’s recommendations.

Specialized Services

Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

Children’s Treatment Centres across Ontario provide physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech and language services to children with physical and/or developmental disabilities, chronic illness and/or communication disorders, and their families. About 54,000 children receive services each year.

Through respite services, the ministry helps provide meaningful activities for children and youth that promote the development of skills and relationships. Services are provided in the family home or in a setting outside the home such as in a group home.

In 2009-10, Ontario will invest $100.3 million for Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services.

In addition, in 2008-09, Ontario provided $17 million to complete three capital projects for Children’s Treatment Centres. In 2009-10, new treatment centres are scheduled to open in North Bay and Windsor.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Services

Ontario supports services for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families. Since July 2005, children of all ages are eligible to receive therapy through the Autism Intervention Program. As the demand for these services has increased, the ministry has worked with parents and experts in the field of autism research to address access to services and supports, including respite for families.

The ministry is also working with the Ministry of Education to improve supports for children and youth with autism in schools. In 2009-10, Ontario will expand a current project involving the implementation of collaborative service deliveries to create transition teams to help children receiving intensive behavioural intervention (IBI) make the move to publicly funded schools. The project now exists in 16 school boards, extending to all children moving from the IBI program to school by the end of 2010.

Ontario continues to provide training for principals, teachers and education assistants to support more than 9,000 Ontario children who receive applied behavioural analysis (ABA) in schools. In addition, 12 Ontario colleges offer the Graduate Certificate Program in Autism and Behavioural Science. More than 360 students have already graduated from this program and enrolment in 2008-09 grew to more than 500 students. This will continue to increase the pool of qualified therapists to work in the Autism Intervention Program, the education sector and other children’s agencies.

The ministry also offers respite support and services for families of children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. More than 3,600 families received respite services to provide temporary relief from the demands of caring for a child with ASD. As well, more than 800 kids with ASD went to summer camp in 2008-09 to learn new skills and make new friends, while providing a much needed break for their families.

Ontario will invest $161.4 million in services for children and youth with ASD in 2009-10.

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) is a non-taxable financial benefit that will reach over one million Ontario children and 600,000 low-income families. A centrepiece of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, the OCB gives low-income families the financial support they need to provide essentials like food and shelter for their children and is making it easier for parents to leave social assistance for work. To be considered for the benefit, individuals need to file their annual income taxes and apply for the Canada Child Tax Benefit.

In July 2009, the OCB will increase to a maximum of $1,100 per child, per year, or almost $92 per child, per month. By 2012, when the OCB is fully implemented, families will receive as much as $1,310 per child. In July 2007, eligible families received a one-time OCB down payment of up to $250 for each child under age 18.

Ontario will invest $734 million in OCB in 2009-10.

Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

In 2009-10, the ministry is providing funding of $15.8 million, equivalent to the Ontario Child Benefit, to children’s aid societies to support improved outcomes for children and youth in care and leaving care. The funds will be used to provide more opportunities for children and youth in care to participate in recreational and learning programs. Older youth will also participate in a savings program to help them prepare for independence and the transition to adulthood.

Delivering the Ministry’s Programs and Services

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services programs and services are delivered in four ways:

  1. Through directly operated facilities and probation offices
    The ministry directly operates 64 probation offices and seven secure custody/detention youth centres, including three newly constructed youth justice facilities. These dedicated youth facilities are responsive to the unique needs of youth in conflict with the law. The ministry also directly operates two child and youth mental health centres: Thistletown Regional Centre in Etobicoke and the Child and Parent Resource Institute in London.
  2. Through community-based service agencies
    The ministry provides funding to over 1,000 community-based agencies that partner with the government to deliver program and services. These services are delivered through 53 children’s aid societies, over 260 children’s mental health and community service agencies, 36 public health units, 20 children’s treatment centres, and 197 youth justice agencies. Service contracts between the ministry and the service provider establish accountability requirements. These contracts detail the ministry’s funding, budgetary and financial reporting requirements, program deliverables and outcomes, service volumes, legislative requirements and any additional ministry standards and requirements.
  3. Through municipalities
    Consolidated Municipal Service Managers and District Social Services Administration Boards manage programs funded by ministries. They are responsible for managing the delivery of Ontario’s child care services.
  4. Through direct financial support to families
    The Ontario Child Benefit and respite funding for families with children with autism and the Direct Funding Option offered within the Autism Intervention Program are examples.
Ministry Contribution to Key Priorities & Results
Priorities Better Ontario For Families Healthier Ontario Smarter Ontario Stronger Ontario
Key Results
  • More children arriving in Grade 1 ready to learn
  • More children are screened for risk factors and identified earlier
  • Increase in adoptions
  • More children and youth benefiting from the Ontario Child Benefit
  • More children getting a healthy breakfast or snack
  • More children are screened for risk factors and identified earlier
  • More children receiving supports for special needs
  • Improved function after mental health care
  • More children arriving in Grade 1 ready to learn
  • More at-risk youth successful in school
  • More youth graduating from secondary school
  • More opportunities for youth at risk
  • Fewer youth entering justice system and reduction in reoffending rates
Strategies Support for low-income families; screening programs and support for at-risk families; early learning and child development programs; access to services for children and youth with special needs including autism and mental health issues; nutrition programs; stability for children in need of protection. Screening programs and support for at-risk families; early learning and child development programs; increased access to services for children and youth with special needs and mental health issues; nutrition programs. Support for low-income families; Programs for atrisk youth and youth in conflict with the law; early learning and child development programs; nutrition programs; focus on permanency for children in care; increased access to services for children and youth with special needs and mental health issues. Programs for at-risk youth and youth in conflict with the law; support for lowincome families; support for low-income families; increased support for families with children with special needs and mental health issues.
Major Activities

Ontario Child Benefit

Early Learning and Child Development

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs and services

Child protection services and Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

Ontario Child Benefit

Early Learning and Child Development

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Student Nutrition Program

Mental health programs and services

Ontario Child Benefit

Early Learning and Child Development

Youth Opportunities Strategy

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs & services

Child protection services

Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

Ontario Child Benefit

Youth Opportunities Strategy

Youth Justice Services

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs and services

Ministry Contribution to Priorities & Results

The ministry’s initiatives support the government’s priorities of a healthier Ontario, a smarter Ontario, a stronger Ontario and a better Ontario for families. With its community partners, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services is developing and tracking outcomes for children and youth. These will help the ministry to better determine how programs are working and if young people are getting the services that they need.

Early Learning and Child Development

Child Care and Early Learning

Since 2004, Ontario has created more than 22,000 new licensed child care spaces, including 325 culturally-appropriate spaces for Aboriginal children living off-reserve. In 2007-08, there was an increase of 8,593 licensed child care spaces for a total of 256,748 spaces.

Performance Measure: Growth in licensed child care spaces

Growth in licensed child care spaces

Healthy Babies Healthy Children

Healthy Babies Healthy Children provides screening for pregnant women and every new baby and mother. It is designed to help families promote healthy child development and help their children reach their full potential. In 2007-08 the program provided prenatal screening to 27,400 pregnant women and screened 124,000 live births to identify risk factors.

Performance Measure: Number of children screened at birth through Healthy Babies Healthy Children

children screened at birth through Healthy Babies Healthy Children

Early Years Community Support

Preschool Speech and Language identifies children with speech and language disorders as early as possible and provides these children with services to enable them to develop communication and early literacy skills so they are ready to learn when they start school. In 2007-08, the program provided service to 53,338 children, up 16 percent since 2003-04.

The Infant Hearing Program provides newborn hearing screening in hospitals and community settings, audiology assessment and hearing aid selection, monitoring for babies born at risk of early childhood hearing loss and services to support language development in infants and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In 2007-08, the program provided hearing screening for 121,770 newborns, which is 93 percent of all live births in Ontario.

Children and Youth At Risk

Child Protection Services

The ministry is working with Ontario’s 53 children’s aid societies and community partners to make the child protection system more accountable, flexible and responsive to the needs of children, youth and their families receiving care. Changes to the Child and Family Services Act since 2006 have created more options for children and youth in care to be placed in a permanent home. These changes make it easier for relatives or community members to provide permanent homes for children and youth. They also allow more children to be adopted, while still maintaining ties to their birth family and to their community. The number of completed Children’s Aid Society adoptions in Ontario has reflected the changes in the Child and Family Services Act and the increase in the number of permanency options available for children and youth in care.

Performance Measure: Number of completed Children’s Aid Societies adoptions.

completed Children’s Aid Societies adoptions

Child and Youth Mental Health

The ministry invested $507.9 million in 2008-09, which included directly operated facilities, to provide mental health services to children and youth in Ontario. Through this funding, the government is building on its previous investments in more than 260 child and youth mental health agencies and 17 hospital-based outpatient programs.

By continuing to reduce overlap and delays within the system, Ontario is committed to reducing wait times for children and youth requiring mental health services, while also improving outcomes for those who access those services.

Performance Measure: Percentage of children and youth showing improved functioning at exit from Child and Youth Mental Health Services

children and youth showing improved functioning at exit from Child and Youth Mental Health Services

Performance Measure: Average wait time from referral to receipt of "regular ongoing" Child and Youth Mental Health Services

Average wait time from referral to receipt of 'regular ongoing' Child and Youth Mental Health Services

Youth Justice Services

Evidence indicates that a broad range of community-based and custodial programs and services can reduce re-offending. To support this, an Effective Programming Project is under way that involves a comprehensive review of the research literature, consultations with experts and stakeholders, and strategies for training, monitoring and evaluating its full implementation across the youth justice system. The work of this project will ensure that evidence-based practice underpins the delivery of all youth justice services.

Changes to Ontario’s youth justice system are expected to result in a five per cent reduction, over two years, in re-offending rates for youth released from custody, and youth released from probation. A 2006-07 baseline for re-offending was determined through a two-year follow-up of youth who left care or supervision in 2004-05.

In 2007-08 the average daily population for the system was 12,062 including 11,257 youth under community supervision, 287 in open custody/detention and 518 youth in secure custody/detention.

Performance Measure: Number of youth who re-offend as a percentage of all youth tracked

youth who re-offend as a percentage of all youth tracked

Youth Justice Services: New Facilities

The secure custody/detention system is being transformed into a dedicated youth justice system to meet the needs of youth who were 12 to 17 at the time of the offence. A key component of this transformation includes the government’s emphasis on effective programming based on research into what works best with youth.

In 2008-09, the ministry opened new youth justice facilities in Fort Frances, Sault Ste. Marie and Thunder Bay and completed an expansion of a facility in Ottawa. A new facility in Brampton, which will serve up to 192 youth, is scheduled to open in spring 2009.

The Fort Frances facility, the first secure custody facility for Aboriginal youth in Canada, serves up to 12 Aboriginal youth from northwestern Ontario and is operated by an Aboriginal organization. The Sault Ste. Marie facility and the Thunder Bay facility each serve up to 16 youth and the expanded Ottawa facility serves up to 40 youth.

Youth Opportunities Strategy

In 2008-09, approximately 2,000 youth from high needs neighbourhoods in Toronto, Windsor, Hamilton, London, Thunder Bay, Ottawa, Durham region and communities policed by the Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service gained valuable training and work experience as well as mentoring and counselling services through the program:

Youthconnect.ca provides information and resources to young people across Ontario and information about programs like Summer Jobs for Youth. In 2008, the website received over 118,000 visitors.

The Youth Opportunities Strategy is a comprehensive plan to provide youth from high-needs neighbourhoods with opportunities to reach their full potential. In 2008-09, Ontario invested $11 million on the program.

Performance Measure: Expanded summer job and training opportunities for vulnerable youth

Expanded summer job and training opportunities for vulnerable youth

Specialized Services

Autism Spectrum Disorder

The number of children with autism spectrum disorders receiving Intensive Behavioural Intervention has increased from 500 in 2004 to 1,404 in 2007-08.

Ontario has more than tripled autism spending from $44 million to $158 million in five years and more than doubled the number of children receiving Intensive Behavioural Intervention in the same time period. As well, the government responded to calls for transparency and consistency in decisions related to access to IBI therapy by establishing one expert panel to develop clinical practice guidelines and another to establish benchmarks.

Performance Measure: Autism Intervention Program – Number of children receiving IBI

Number of children receiving IBI

Note – Data reflects point in time service statistics at fiscal year end.

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) gives low-income families financial support that they need to provide for their children. The OCB helps build a stronger economy by making it easier for parents to leave social assistance for work. In July 2007, eligible families received a one-time OCB down payment of up to $250 for each dependant child under age 18. In July 2009, the OCB will increase to a maximum of $1,100 per child, per year or almost $92 per child, per month.

Organization Chart

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Organization chart

Cost Sharing with the Federal Government

Independent of block funding received by the province under the Canada Social Transfer (CST) for Early Childhood Development (ECD) and Early Learning and Child Care (ELCC), the province receives federal funding under the following cost-sharing agreements:

For the 2009-10 fiscal year, federal contributions are estimated at:

  Cash Accrual
Indian Welfare Services Agreement nbsp;
Child Care $10,000,000 $11,000,000
Children and Youth at Risk $98,682,000 $98,662,000
Subtotal $108,682,000 $109,662,000
Agreement re: Youth Justice Services  
Youth Justice Services $71,330,000 $64,949,000
Subtotal $71,330,000 $64,949,000
Total $180,012,000 $174,611,000

Statutes Administered by the Ministry

Agencies, Boards and Commissions

  2009-10 Estimates 2008-09 Interim Actuals 2007-08 Actuals
Child and Family Services Review Board (CFSRB) 778,900 2,050,594 1,585,962
Custody Review Board (CRB) 94,000 24,880 44,656

Figures for CFSRB include Salaries and Wages

The Child and Family Services Review Board is a tribunal with authority to review matters:

The Custody Review Board hears applications and makes recommendations to Provincial Directors who perform duties under the Young Offenders Act, the Youth Criminal Justice Act and the Child and Family Services Act with respect to youth in conflict with the law. The young person may apply to the Board for a review of a director’s decision respecting the following matters:

The CFSRB and CRB are administratively integrated with a common Board Chair. The Boards operate at arms-length from government and its decisions are not subject to review by a government minister or ministry official.

Ministry Financial Information

Table 1: Ministry Planned Expenditures 2009-10

  Ministry Planned Expenditures ($M) 2009-10
Operating $4,481.8
Infrastructure $8.4
BPS Consolidation ($83.7)
Total including Consolidation $4,406.5

Table 2: Overall Summary (Operating and Capital)

Votes/Programs Estimates 2009-10 $ Change from Estimates 2008-09 $ % Estimates 2008-09* $ Interim Actuals 2008-09* $ Actuals 2007-08* $
$ $ % $ $ $
OPERATING AND CAPITAL            
             
Ministry Administration 11,630,200 (824,400) (6.6 %) 12,454,600 12,588,358 11,845,362
Children and Youth Services 4,470,118,600 478,733,000 12.0 % 3,991,385,600 4,020,862,017 3,745,373,640
Infrastructure 8,410,000 (163,915,000) (95.1 %) 172,325,000 128,006,091 64,942,002
Total including Special Warrants 4,490,158,800 313,993,600 7.5 % 4,176,165,200 4,161,456,466 3,822,161,004
Less: Special Warrants 0 0 - 0 0 0
Total to be Voted 4,490,158,800 313,993,600 7.5 % 4,176,165,200 4,161,456,466 3,822,161,004
Special Warrants 0 0 - 0 0 0
Statutory Appropriations 88,014 24,000 37.5 % 64,014 65,968 54,667
Ministry Total Operating and Capital 4,490,246,814 314,017,600 7.5 % 4,176,229,214 4,161,522,434 3,822,215,671
Consolidation (83,700,000) 5,500,000 (6.2 %) (89,200 000) (93,872,472) (88,770,992)
Ministry Total Operating and Capital including Consolidation 4,406,546,814 319,517,600 7.8 % 4,087,029,214 4,067,649,962 3,733,444,679

Assets

Votes/Programs Estimates 2009-10 Change from Estimates 2008-09 Estimates 2008-09 Interim Actuals 2008-09 Actuals 2007-08
$ $ % $ $ $
Children and Youth Services 2,740,000 640,000 30.5 % 2,100,000 0 0
Total Ministry Assets 2,740,000 640,000 30.5 % 2,100,000 0 0
Less: Special Warrants 0 0 - 0 0 0
Total Assets to be Voted 2,740,000 640,000 30.5 % 2,100,000 0 0

* Amounts have been restated for transfers of funding from Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services.

Appendix I: Annual Report 2008-09

Ministry Achievements in 2008-09

Early Learning and Child Development

Child Care and Early Learning

Ontario made high quality child care more affordable for families as part of a new $23 million investment. Families with a net income under $20,000 became eligible for a full subsidy, while families receiving financial child care assistance with a net income of $40,000, for example, began paying about $8 per day for licensed child care. The government also invested $2 million to support the creation of new child care spaces in French-language schools.

Early Learning Advisor Dr. Charles Pascal, one of Canada’s leading experts in early childhood education, continued to consult with parents and educators in the school and early childhood education systems to develop recommendations on a full-day of learning for four and five year olds. Dr. Pascal’s report is expected in spring 2009.

The province continued to help recruit and retain highly skilled child care professionals by providing grants to help existing child care workers get their early childhood education diploma. The province also worked with key partners to support new education and capacity-building initiatives for child care supervisors.

The College of Early Childhood Educators, created by the province to set high standards for the profession, began accepting applications for membership. The ministry provided funding so the college could waive the one-time application fee for those applying for membership by January 31, 2009. The college has completed its transitional period and is now a fully operational self-regulatory organization.

Healthy Babies Healthy Children and Early Years Community Support

Also in 2008-09, the ministry continued to support early healthy child development through:

The ministry doubled its funding of the student nutrition program to help more children and youth - especially those in high-needs neighbourhoods - get a healthy breakfast or snack so they are ready to learn in class. An additional $32 million over three years will help create 700 new breakfast programs and enhance 300 existing programs. The student nutrition program currently provides healthy meals and snacks to over 400,000 kids across Ontario.

An expert panel on fertility treatment and adoption was appointed to help find solutions for people who are trying to start or expand a family. The 12-member panel will recommend ways to help make fertility treatment and adoption more accessible and affordable. The panel includes adoptive parents, people who have had personal experience with infertility and representatives from the medical and adoption communities.

Children and Youth at Risk

Child Protection Services

Ontario’s child protection services help children and youth who have been or are at risk of being abused or neglected to grow up in a safe, stable, caring environment. Fifty-three children’s aid societies provide services that protect children and help place them for adoption. Five northern Aboriginal children’s aid societies serve 63 of Ontario’s 134 First Nation communities on and off reserve. Another serves only urban native clients.

Recently implemented changes - including a standardized complaint process, updated and evidence-based tools to assess risk to a child’s safety, and the resolution of more child protection cases outside the courtroom through alternative dispute resolution - continued to provide improved service for children and families.

The ministry spent more than $1.4 billion for child protection services in 2008-09.

Child and Youth Mental Health

Mental health services for children and youth continued to be delivered through more than 260 child and youth mental health agencies, 17 hospital-based outpatient programs and two directly-operated child and youth mental health centres.

More Aboriginal children and youth in urban and off-reserve communities across Ontario benefited from new and enhanced programs that help them build confidence and make healthy choices. The Akwe:go program, for kids seven to 12, was expanded and a new program called Wasa-Nabin was established for youth 12 to 18.

The Ontario Child and Youth Telepsychiatry Program continued to reduce travel and wait times for children and youth who need to see a psychiatrist in rural, remote and underserved communities. The program, which uses video-conferencing technology, provides approximately 1,400 clinical consultations each year.

Together with community partners and the Ministries of Education and Health and Long-Term Care, progress was made mapping all child and youth mental health services across Ontario. This initiative will result in a more coordinated, collaborative and responsive mental health system. The Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario continued its efforts to advance knowledge and understanding of mental health disorders in children and youth.

Youth Justice Services

Ontario passed legislation in February 2009 to create a single, youth-focused, legislative framework governing custody, detention and community programs for youth in conflict with the law aged 12 to 17 at the time of an offence.

The Child and Family Services Statute Law Amendment Act, 2009 completes the government’s transformation of Ontario’s youth justice correctional system to a separate system that is no longer part of the adult system. A key goal of this transformation is reducing the number of youth who re-offend. This will make communities safer and give youth a better opportunity to succeed.

As of April 1, 2009, youth in conflict with the law are now located in dedicated youth justice facilities separate from adult correctional institutions. New youth justice facilities were opened in Sault Ste. Marie, Fort Frances and Thunder Bay. A facility in Ottawa was expanded and a new facility in Brampton is scheduled to open in spring 2009.

The ministry continued to invest in the implementation of the Alternatives to Custody and Community Interventions Strategy. The strategy provides meaningful rehabilitation to youth in conflict with the law, while holding them accountable for their actions. Programs and services - such as prevention, diversion, alternative sentencing and reintegration - are responsive to the needs of young people, including specific populations such as Aboriginal youth and youth with mental health issues. In 2008-09, the ministry invested $1.6 million in Aboriginal Alternatives to Custody programs designed to help Aboriginal youth in or at risk of conflict with the law.

In November 2008, former Chief Justice Roy McMurtry and former Speaker of the Legislature Alvin Curling completed a comprehensive review of the Roots of Youth Violence to help identify the underlying causes contributing to violence involving young people.

The Youth Opportunities Strategy helps young people faced with significant challenges reach their full potential and achieve individual success. In 2008-09, the strategy continued to be implemented in high needs neighbourhoods in Toronto, Durham Region, Windsor, London, Thunder Bay, Hamilton, Ottawa and communities policed by Nishnawbe-Aski Police Service. It included:

The Youth Challenge Fund supports youth-led programs operated by more than 80 organizations working in 13 priority areas in Toronto. In 2008-09, the government matched $7.8 million in private sector donations, bringing its total investment to more than $30 million over the last three years.

Residential Services

Children and youth may come into residential care through a court order for child protection or as a result of being in conflict with the law. Other children may require residential care due to developmental and physical challenges, medically fragile conditions, behavioural difficulties, psychiatric disorders or substance abuse.

Residential care is provided through either group or foster care settings. Some residential services offer specialized treatments and therapeutic programs while others provide care and support to children and youth at risk. The ministry funds approximately 5,000 beds in group homes, 11,000 beds in foster homes and 1,300 beds for youth in custody/detention.

In 2008-09, new standards were implemented to increase the quality, safety and security of residential settings for children and youth. These new standards are designed to ensure the competency of licence applicants, strengthen criminal reference checks, improve food and nutrition standards and enhance the cultural sensitivity of staff.

In February 2009, the ministry released the summary report of the Expert Panel on Standards of Care for the Administration of Psychotropic Medications to Children and Youth Living in Licensed Residential Settings. The ministry is proceeding with a focused approach to implementing the expert panel’s recommendations.

Specialized Services

Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

The ministry invested $82.1 million for core rehabilitative services in 20 children’s treatment centres in 2008-09. Children’s Treatment Centres provide rehabilitation services - including physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech language services - to children and youth up to 19 years of age with physical and/or developmental disabilities, chronic illness and/or communication disorders. Approximately 54,000 children and youth receive services each year.

Also in 2008-09, the ministry invested $13.4 million to complete capital projects for the centres in Thunder Bay, North Bay and Windsor.

The ministry invested almost $18.7 million for respite services for families with children who are medically fragile, technology dependent or who have multiple special needs. Services are provided in the family home or in a setting outside the home, such as a group home, and may include meaningful activities for kids that promote the development of skills and relationships.

Autism Spectrum Disorder Services

The ministry invested $153.7 million in 2008-09 to provide services to children and youth with autism and their families.

As part of this investment, more than 800 kids with autism attended 60 day and overnight summer camps across the province and more than 500 children and youth took part in March break camps designed especially for them. These camps gave kids with autism a unique learning experience while giving families some much-needed relief from caring for their children day after day.

In response to calls from parents for transparency and consistency in determining who accesses Intensive Behaviour Intervention (IBI) treatment and how children’s progress is measured, an independent, arm’s-length group developed guidelines to help clinicians make more informed decisions based on evidence and best practices. The Expert Clinical Panel was chaired by world-renowned autism researcher Dr. Peter Szatmari of McMaster University and included a parent of a child with autism, a clinical director, autism researchers and a direct funding provider.

The panel also recommended the development of benchmarks as a tool to support clinicians using the clinical practice guidelines. The Benchmark Development Expert Panel, chaired by Dr. Nancy Freeman, submitted its final report to the ministry in September 2008.

The College Graduate Certificate Program in Autism and Behavioural Science – developed by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services in collaboration with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - continued to increase the pool of qualified professionals to work with children and youth with autism. Over 500 students were enrolled in the program at 12 colleges across Ontario in 2008-09.

The ministry continued to fund training for resource teachers and home visitors in every region of the province. As of December 2008, more than 1,100 resource teachers and home visitors had received appropriate training.

More than 3,600 families with children with autism benefited from respite services as well. The ministry’s investment in Autism services includes $7.8 million in 2008-09 to provide temporary relief to families caring for a child with autism.

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) is a non-taxable benefit to help low-income families provide for their children. To be considered for the benefit, individuals need to file their annual income taxes and apply for the Canada Child Tax Benefit.

In 2008-09, the ministry provided $305 million to approximately 465,000 families eligible to receive up to $600 per year for each child. As part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, the OCB will increase from $600 to a maximum of $1,100 per child per year in July 2009.

The ministry also began providing new funding - equivalent to the maximum OCB - to children and youth in the care of children’s aid societies. This funding helps provide supports that include tutoring, skills building and recreational programs for all children and youth in care based on their individual needs. Older youth also participate in a savings program to help them prepare for independence and the transition to adulthood. These youth will access their savings when they leave care.

  Ministry Interim Expenditures ($M) 2008-09
Operating 4,034
Capital 128
BPS Consolidation (94)
   
Staff Strength(as of March 31, 2009) 2,389 Full-time equivalents