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Results-based Plan Briefing Book 2011-12

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Ministry of Children and Youth Services

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
The Estimates, 2011-12

Table of Contents

RESULTS-BASED PLAN 2011-12

Ministry Overview

APPENDIX I: ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11

Results-based Plan 2011-12

Ministry of Children and Youth Services
Overview

Introduction

Ontario is home to more than 2.8 million children and youth. This highly diverse and talented group of young people are the key to Ontario’s future success and prosperity. They all deserve the opportunity to realize their full potential and become active, productive members of our community. The Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) is committed to improving how services are provided to Ontario’s young people and their families by focusing on improving outcomes and a better service experience.

The majority of ministry funding flows as transfer payments to agencies to provide services on behalf of the government. The ministry also directly operates nine facilities (seven in the youth justice system and two child and youth mental health centres) as well as 64 probation offices across Ontario.

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services funds and/or provides:

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Ministry Vision

The Ministry of Children and Youth Services’ vision is an Ontario where all children and youth have the best opportunity to succeed and reach their full potential.

Ministry Mandate

The ministry works with community partners, other ministries, agencies, and municipalities to fund or provide:

In 2011-12, the ministry’s key priorities include:

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Ministry Programs and Services: Summary

The following programs and services are delivered through the Ministry of Children and Youth Services:

Healthy Child Development

Children and Youth at Risk

Specialized Services

Ontario Child Benefit

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Key Activities

Healthy Child Development

Healthy Babies Healthy Children

The Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program provides screening for pregnant women and every new mother and baby, offers information on child development and parenting to families with newborns and provides extra support to those families who need it. The ministry will strengthen the program in 2011-12 through an enhanced screening tool and best practice guidelines for the home visiting component of the program.

In 2011-12, the ministry will invest $86.5 million in the Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program.

Early Years Community Support

The ministry supports early healthy child development through:

Working with the Ministries of Education and Health and Long-Term Care, the ministry will develop strategies to improve speech and language services for children and youth in 2011-12.

The ministry is working on a policy framework to help guide its plans to establish Best Start Child and Family Centres in communities across Ontario - a key recommendation of Dr. Charles Pascal, the government’s advisor on early learning. These centres will provide parents with easy access to services that support early child development and to community-based resources such as family counselling, community centres and language services for newcomers. The framework is expected to be completed by summer 2011.

Ontario’s Student Nutrition Program will continue to provide nutritious meals and snacks to children and youth – especially those in high-needs neighbourhoods – so they are ready to learn in school. In 2010, the program served an estimated 600,000 kids across Ontario.

As a key participant in the Children’s Health Partnership Strategy, the ministry will continue to work with the private sector and other ministries – including Health Promotion and Sport, Education, Health and Long-Term Care and Environment – to promote better health for children.

The ministry will continue to support 107 Ontario Early Years Centres and a number of satellite centres. These centres offer informal and formal programs and services, such as parenting and nutrition workshops.

In 2011-12, the ministry will invest $192.8 million in Early Years Community Support.

Child Care

Responsibility for child care was transferred from the Ministry of Children and Youth Services to the Ministry of Education in 2010-11. The ministry remains responsible for licensing and inspecting approximately 4,800 child care centres and 135 private-home day care agencies in Ontario.

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Children and Youth at Risk

Child Protection Services

Ontario’s child protection services help children and youth who have been, or are at risk of being, abused or neglected, grow up in safe, stable, caring environments. Fifty-three children’s aid societies (CASs), including six Aboriginal CASs, protect children and help place them for adoption.

The ministry provides children’s aid societies with practice standards and tools to assess the risk to a child’s safety and match their response to the needs of the child and family. An emphasis is placed on permanency planning for children and youth and resolving child protection cases outside the courtroom through alternative dispute resolution.

In 2011-12, the ministry will keep working with the Commission to Promote Sustainable Child Welfare to transform the child protection system. This includes managing the CAS amalgamation process, modernizing the funding model for CASs, implementing expenditure management procedures and streamlining administrative demands on CASs. The ministry will also support CASs as they work to improve accountability and outcomes for children.

The ministry will continue development of the Child Protection Information Network (CPIN), part of the government’s plan to modernize the child protection system so vulnerable kids and their families can continue to get the services they need. CPIN will provide all children’s aid societies with the information they need in one place. It will help agencies more easily manage case files and finances, share information with each other and make decisions for the children they serve.

In order to provide more stability to youth in care that are not adopted, the ministry will encourage agreements between young people and their foster parents so they can stay in the home past age 18. It will also help young people access available financial support to pursue and complete postsecondary education and training.

In 2011-12, the ministry will invest approximately $1.5 billion in Child Protection Services.

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Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption

The ministry will continue to examine the recommendations made by the Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption to make fertility treatment and adoption more accessible and affordable. It will also continue its efforts to increase adoptions in Ontario and the number of stable, permanent homes for Crown wards

In April 2011, the ministry introduced amendments to the Child and Family Services Act that, if passed, along with other changes, would make it easier for prospective parents to adopt a child and offer more support for youth in care to transition to adulthood.

Child Poverty

Ontario’s first-ever poverty reduction strategy, Breaking the Cycle, is focused on improving opportunities for children and their families. The strategy, released in December 2008, sets a target of reducing child poverty by 25 per cent over five years.

In 2011-12, year three of the strategy, the government will release a comprehensive Mental Health and Addictions Strategy and the Social Innovation Strategy.

The Mental Health and Addictions Strategy will initially focus on improved access to high quality services for children and youth through reduced wait times and person-centred care. The strategy will also focus on building a strong foundation for sustainable system transformation.

The Social Innovation Strategy is a multi-phase plan to help social enterprise innovators access business tools and supports. The first phase of the strategy will see existing programs for business start-ups extended to social innovators such as not-for-profit organizations and agencies serving low-income people. A social innovation summit will be held to bring provincial, national and international experts together to share and develop ideas.

Measuring progress and communicating results to Ontarians is an important part of the poverty reduction strategy. The ministry will continue to implement the strategy in 2011-12 and will report on progress in the third annual report, to be released in December 2011.

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Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) – the centrepiece of the government’s poverty reduction strategy – is a non-taxable benefit that helps low-income families provide for their children. Low-income families who qualify receive up to a maximum of $1,100 per child per year. To be considered for the benefit, individuals need to file their annual income taxes and register their child for the Canada Child Tax Benefit. In 2011-12, the OCB will help more than one million kids and their families.

The ministry also provides funding equivalent to the maximum OCB to children and youth in the care of children’s aid societies. This funding helps provide supports such as tutoring, skills building and recreational programs to all children and youth in care. Older youth also participate in a savings program to help them prepare for independence and the transition to adulthood. These youth will have access to their savings when they leave care.

The ministry will invest $935.9 million in the OCB in 2011-12.

Youth Policy Framework

The Review of the Roots of Youth Violence Report, released in 2008, called on the government to develop a guide to improve youth-serving programs across all levels of government and across all sectors.

In 2011-12, the ministry will continue consulting with youth and youth experts to help in the development of a Youth Policy Framework. To ensure the thoughts and ideas of young people are captured in the framework, the ministry has established a Youth Development Committee, made up of 25 young Ontarians with different backgrounds and lived experiences. The framework will help those who support youth in their daily lives – including parents, community leaders, service providers and decision-makers – better understand what young people need to reach their full potential.

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Child and Youth Mental Health

The ministry will continue working in 2011-12 to create a mental health system that delivers the right services and supports to children and youth when they need them, as close to home as possible. Mental health services for children and youth are delivered through more than 260 child and youth mental health agencies, 17 hospital-based outpatient programs, two directly-operated child and youth mental health centres and on-site clinical supports at seven directly-operated secure custody/detention facilities for youth in conflict with the law.

The ministry will be investing in a comprehensive Mental Health and Addictions Strategy, addressing children and youth first. The strategy will focus on strengthening services for children and youth, creating a more integrated and responsive system and building awareness and capacity within the education system to support students and their families.

The ministry will invest $573.5 million in Child and Youth Mental Health in 2011-12.

Youth Justice Services

The goals of youth justice services are to reduce re-offending, contribute to community safety and prevent youth crime through rehabilitative programming, holding youth accountable and creating opportunities for youth at risk. By helping youth make better choices and lessening the likelihood they will re-offend, Ontario is making communities safer while giving youth a better opportunity to succeed.

The ministry will continue to support a broad range of evidence-informed community programs, ranging from diversion to reintegration of youth from custody. In 2010-11, trends of reduced use of custody continued, with more youth being diverted from the formal court process for less serious offences and more youth being referred to appropriate alternative to custody programs/interventions. The majority of youth in conflict with the law received service/supervision in the community including diversion, rehabilitation, probation and supports for mental health issues. Youth who are placed in custody and detention facilities have the opportunity to participate in rehabilitative programs that will help them develop the skills they need to achieve success in the community. Programs include skills development, substance abuse counselling, life skills programs and anger management.

In 2011-12, the ministry will continue to strengthen the youth justice service system to improve and report on outcomes for youth. Priorities include expanding evidence-based programming and support for youth at its facilities and using a strengths-based approach to probation care management.

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Youth Opportunities Strategy

The Youth Opportunities Strategy, part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, helps at-risk youth ages 15 to 18 reach their full potential and achieve individual success. The strategy includes the Summer Jobs for Youth Program and the Youth in Policing Initiative.

Youthconnect.ca, the ministry’s website targeted to young people, will continue to provide information about these programs and other resources available to youth in Ontario.

The ministry will invest over $357.9 million in youth justice services in 2011-12, which includes a broad range of community-based and direct and transfer payment operated custodial programs, services to reduce re-offending and the Youth Opportunities Strategy.

Residential Services

Children and youth may come into residential care through a court order for child protection or as a result of being in conflict with the law. Other children may require residential care due to developmental and physical challenges, medically-fragile conditions, behavioural difficulties, psychiatric disorders or substance abuse.

Residential care is provided through group or foster care settings. In 2010-11, the ministry continued to fund more than 4,900 beds in 545 group homes, 12,000 beds in more than 8,200 foster homes, and approximately 1,200 beds for youth in conflict with the law.

The Provincial Transition Planning Framework for Young People with Developmental Disabilities – developed by the Ministries of Children and Youth Services and Community and Social Services – will help young people with developmental disabilities and their families make important decisions about their transition from children services to adult services in a manner that promotes social inclusion, greater self-reliance and independence.

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Services and Supports for Aboriginal Children and Youth

The ministry will continue to meet the unique needs of Aboriginal young people living on- and off-reserve across Ontario. It will continue to fund the Aboriginal Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program, the Aboriginal Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Child Nutrition Program, the Akwe:go and Wasa-Nabin Urban Aboriginal Programs and community-based programs for Aboriginal youth in conflict with the law.

John Beaucage, a former Grand Council Chief of the Anishinabek Nation and Aboriginal Advisor to the Minister of Children and Youth Services, will guide discussions with Aboriginal leaders and front-line service providers on child welfare issues and will continue to provide advice to the minister on Aboriginal child welfare policy matters.

An April 2011 summit at the Fort William First Nation near Thunder Bay – hosted by the ministry and Mr. Beaucage – will help the ministry continue to focus on providing services that best meet the needs of Aboriginal children and youth.

The ministry will also continue to work with a number of Aboriginal service providers seeking designation as Aboriginal Children’s Aid Societies.

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Specialized Services

Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

Children’s Treatment Centres (CTCs) provide rehabilitation services to children and youth up to 19 years of age with physical and/or developmental disabilities, chronic illness and/or communication disorders. CTCs provide core rehabilitation services including physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech and language therapy. A variety of other services and clinics – such as autism, preschool speech and language, respite and developmental programs – are offered depending on local needs and the mix of providers in each community.

There are 21 CTCs in Ontario, 20 of which are funded by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services. Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital is funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care because it provides in-patient services. According to the Ontario Association of Children’s Rehabilitation Services (OACRS), CTCs serve approximately 60,000 children each year.

In 2010, the ministry announced an additional $9 million in annual base funding for the 20 CTCs to provide more services for children and youth on waiting lists. OACRS estimated this new funding would benefit an additional 3,600 children and youth with special needs each year.

The ministry will continue to fund respite services for families with children who are medically-fragile, technology- dependent or who have multiple special needs. Services are provided in the family home or in a setting outside the home, such as a group home.

The ministry is working with the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care to review the School Health Support Program, a program that helps kids with special needs attend school. The ministry is also working with the Ministry of Community and Social Services to improve transition planning for young people with developmental disabilities.

In 2011-12, the ministry will invest $109.3 million in Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services, including $91.4 million in ongoing funding for CTCs.

Services and Supports for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

Ontario supports specialized services and supports for children and youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and their families. Since July 2005, children with a diagnosis considered to be towards the severe end of the autism spectrum have been eligible to receive intensive behavioural intervention (IBI) services delivered through the Autism Intervention Program (AIP) regardless of their age. To address the growing demand for these services, the ministry has been working with parents, experts and service providers to plan a broader range of services and supports to meet the needs of children and youth with ASD.

A range of new Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA)-based services will be available starting in late spring 2011, and are expected to benefit approximately 8,000 children and youth with ASD annually. These services will help children and youth with ASD become more independent, develop communication, social and daily living skills, and cope better in school.

Parents want to know how their children are progressing and that they are receiving the treatment and services that best meet their needs. That is why the ministry will be establishing an ASD clinical expert committee by fall 2011 to advise the government on effective interventions, emerging research and best clinical practices. The committee will promote transparency in clinical decision-making and will help ensure that kids with ASD get the right supports at the right time.

To promote even greater transparency, beginning in fall 2011, if a family is not satisfied with a decision related to their child’s eligibility for, or discharge from, IBI services, they will be able to request an independent review. This will reassure parents that decisions affecting their children are fair and objective.

The ministry will expand existing supports for parents of children with ASD. More training and support will be offered to parents so they can incorporate strategies into daily activities at home and further develop the skills their kids are learning at school and/or in a program delivered by an autism service provider. Parents will also have more access to resource materials and information about the full range of services and supports for children and youth with ASD. This additional training and support will help parents better address the needs of their children and also help to reduce family stress.

Twelve Ontario colleges offer the Graduate Certificate Program in Autism and Behavioural Science. This program continues to increase the pool of qualified therapists to work in the Autism Intervention Program, the education sector and other children’s agencies. As of March 2010, 573 students had graduated from the program.

The ministry will continue to work with the Ministry of Education to implement Connections for Students, a program that establishes transition teams to support children leaving the Autism Intervention Program and starting or continuing in a publicly-funded school. As part of Ontario’s School Support Program, approximately 185 autism consultants will continue working in publicly-funded schools to help teachers and staff better understand and respond to the learning and social needs of children and youth with autism.

The ministry will continue to provide funding to help children and youth with autism attend March Break programs and summer camps. Kids enjoy making new friends, learning new skills and participating in fun activities such as swimming, arts and crafts, bowling, skating and music. In 2011-12, the ministry will also continue funding respite services for families caring for a child with autism.

The ministry will invest $192.5 million in services for children and youth with ASD in 2011-12.

Capital Investments in Social Service Facilities

Investing in infrastructure is a critical part of Ontario’s plan to restore growth, save and create jobs in the short term, and build foundations for the future.

In 2011-12, the ministry will invest $15.5 million to help social service agencies better serve children, youth and their families. Projects will include expansions and renovations that will improve security, accessibility and energy efficiency at agency facilities that deliver ministry services.

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Key Priorities/Results and Strategies

Minsitry Contribution to Key Priorities & Results

Priorities Better Ontario For Families Healthier Ontario Smarter Ontario Stronger Ontario
Key Results • More children arriving in Grade 1 ready to learn

• More children screened for risk factors, identified earlier

• Increase in adoptions

• More children and youth whose families need assistance benefit from the Ontario Child Benefit
• More children getting a healthy breakfast or snack

• More children are screened for risk factors and identified earlier

• More children receiving supports for special needs

• Improved function after mental health care
• More children arriving in Grade 1 ready to learn

• More at-risk children and youth successful in school

• More youth graduating from secondary school
• More opportunities for children and youth at risk

• Fewer youth entering justice system and reduction in re-offending rates
Strategies Support for low-income families; screening programs and support for at-risk families; healthy child development programs; access to appropriate services for children and youth with special needs including autism and mental health issues; nutrition programs; stability for children in need of protection. Screening programs and support for at-risk families; healthy child development programs; increased access to appropriate services for children and youth with special needs and mental health issues; nutrition programs. Support for low-income families; programs for at-risk youth and youth in conflict with the law; healthy child development programs; nutrition programs; focus on permanency for children in care; increased access to appropriate services for children and youth with special needs and mental health issues. Programs for at-risk youth and youth in conflict with the law; support for low-income families; increased support for families with children with special needs and mental health issues.
Major Activities

Ontario Child Benefit

Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

Healthy child development

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs and services

Child protection services

Ontario Child Benefit

Healthy child development

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Student Nutrition Program

Mental health programs and services

Enhanced screening at 18 months

Ontario Child Benefit

Ontario Child Benefit Equivalent

Healthy child development

Youth Opportunities Strategy

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs and services

Child protection services

Youth Justice Services

Ontario Child Benefit

Youth Opportunities Strategy

Youth Policy Framework

Youth Justice Services

Services for children and youth with special needs including autism

Mental health programs and services

Ontario's policy framework for children and youth mental health

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Ministry Contribution to Priorities & Results

The ministry’s initiatives support the government’s priorities of a healthier Ontario, a smarter Ontario, a stronger Ontario and a better Ontario for families. With its community partners, the Ministry of Children and Youth Services is developing and tracking outcomes for children and youth to help the ministry determine how programs are working and if young people are getting the services that they need.

Healthy Child Development

Preschool Speech and Language identifies children with speech and language disorders as early as possible and provides these children with services to enable them to develop communication and early literacy skills so they are ready to learn when they start school. In 2009-10, the program provided service to 50,053 children and assessed 19,023 new children.

The Infant Hearing Program provides newborn hearing screening in hospitals and community settings, audiology assessment and hearing aid selection, monitoring for babies born at risk of early childhood hearing loss and services to support language development in infants and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing. In 2009-10, the program provided hearing screening for 122,278 newborns, which is approximately 92 percent of all live births in Ontario.

Healthy Babies Healthy Children

Healthy Babies Healthy Children provides screening for pregnant women and every new baby and mother. It is designed to help families promote healthy child development and help their children reach their full potential. In 2010 the program provided prenatal screening to 27,100 pregnant women and screened 119,200 live births to identify risk factors.

Performance Measure: Number of children screened at birth through Healthy Babies Healthy Children

Children and Youth At Risk

Child Protection Services

The ministry is working with Ontario’s 53 children’s aid societies and community partners to make the child protection system more accountable, flexible and responsive to the needs of children, youth and their families. Changes to the Child and Family Services Act since 2006 have created more permanency options for children and youth in care. These changes make it easier for relatives or community members to provide permanent homes for children and youth. They also allow more children to be adopted, while still maintaining ties to their birth family and to their community.

Performance Measure: Number of completed children’s aid society adoptions.

* Restated based on CAS year-end reports.

** Target for 2010/11 increased from 820 to 870. The performance target for child welfare adoption reflects the ministry’s emphasis on adoption as one of the permanency options as part of Child Welfare Transformation.

Child and Youth Mental Health

The ministry invested $522.2 million in 2009-10, which included directly operated facilities, to provide mental health services to children and youth in Ontario. Through this funding, the government is building on its previous investments in more than 260 child and youth mental health agencies and 17 hospital-based outpatient programs.

By continuing to reduce overlap and delays within the system, Ontario is committed to reducing wait times for children and youth requiring mental health services, while also improving outcomes for those who access these services.

Performance Measure: 1. Percentage of children and youth showing improved functioning at exit from Child and Youth Mental Health Services

Source: Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) Annual Reports

Performance Measure: 2. Average wait time (number of days) from referral to receipt of "regular ongoing" child and youth mental health services

Source: Brief Child and Family Phone Interview (BCFPI) appearing in BCFPI Annual Reports

Youth Justice Services

Evidence indicates that a broad range of community-based and custodial programs and services can reduce re-offending. Demonstrating a commitment to evidence-based programs and services, the ministry established a permanent Effective Programming and Evaluation Unit. The unit is involved with a comprehensive review of the research literature, consultations with academics, experts and stakeholders, and strategies for training, monitoring and evaluating programs and services across the sector. This unit will ensure that evidence-based practices guide and inform the delivery of youth justice services.

Some examples of activities that support effective programming include:

In 2009-10, the average daily population for the system was 11,668 including 10,971 youth under community supervision, 257 in open custody/detention and 440 youth in secure custody/detention.

Performance Measure: Number of youth who re-offend as a percentage of all youth tracked

Youth Opportunities Strategy

In 2010-11, at-risk youth received summer employment experience and year-round support from the youth outreach workers program. In 2010-11, a total of 5,264 summer jobs across 32 communities were provided through the Strategy. Data from 2010-11 is available for programs that take place in the summer months and 2009-10 is available for year-round or school-year programs. The data includes:

The Youth Opportunities Strategy gives at-risk youth valuable work experience that will contribute to their future success and build a strong workforce for Ontario. The strategy is a key part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. In 2010-11, more than $24 million was invested in the program. The federal government supported the YOS in 2010-11.

Performance Measure: Expanded summer job and training opportunities for vulnerable youth

Specialized Services

Autism Spectrum Disorder

The number of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) receiving Intensive Behavioural Intervention (IBI) has increased from 531 in 2003-04 to 1,428 in 2009-10.

Ontario has more than quadrupled autism spending from $44 million to $186.6 million since 2003 and almost tripled the number of children receiving IBI in the same time period. As well, the government is responding to calls for transparency and consistency in decisions related to IBI therapy by making improvements to the Autism Intervention Program. This includes establishing an independent review mechanism for families who are not satisfied with a decision related to their child’s eligibility or to their child’s discharge from IBI services, and establishing an ASD clinical expert committee that will advise the government on emerging research and best clinical practices.

In 2011-12, the ministry is investing $25 million in Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA)-based services and supports that will help children and youth with ASD improve behaviour management or emotional regulation, communication, social and daily living skills. Approximately 8,000 kids with ASD will benefit annually from these services to be available in communities across Ontario starting in late spring 2011.

Performance Measure: Autism Intervention Program – Number of children receiving IBI

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) gives low-income families financial support that they need to provide for their children. The OCB helps build a stronger economy by making it easier for parents to leave social assistance for work. In July 2007, eligible families received a one-time OCB down payment of up to $250 for each dependent child under age 18 and in July 2008, monthly payments began. In July 2009, the OCB increased to a maximum annual payment of $1,100 per child, or almost $92 per child, per month – two years ahead of schedule.

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Cost Sharing with the Federal Government

Independent of block funding received by the province under the Canada Social Transfer (CST), the province receives federal funding under the following cost-sharing agreements:

For the 2011-12 fiscal year, federal contributions are estimated at:

Cash Accrual
Indian Welfare Services Agreement
Children and Youth at Risk
$103,502,000 $105,114,000
Subtotal $103,502,000 $105,114,000
Agreement re: Youth Justice Services
Youth Justice Services
$64,934,000 $64,934,000
Subtotal $64,934,000 $64,934,000
Total $168,436,000 $170,048,000

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Statutes Administered by the Ministry

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Ministry Financial Information

Table 1: Ministry Planned Expenditures 2011-12

Ministry Planned Expenditures ($M) 2011-12
Operating $4,010.6
Infrastructure $15.6
BPS Consolidation ($94.7)
Total including
Consolidation
$3,931.5

Table 2: Overall Summary (Operating and Capital)

Votes/Programs Estimates
2011—2012
Change from Estimates
2010—2011
Estimates
2010—2011*
Interim Actuals
2010—2011*
Actuals
2009—2010*
$ $ % $ $ $
OPERATING AND CAPITAL
Ministry Administration 13,910,500 704,500 5.3% 13,206,000 11,916,309 11,229,383
Children and Youth Services 3,996,651,400 107,056,800 2.8% 3,889,594,600 3,907,190,796 3,657,866,053
Infrastructure 15,478,200 1,011,200 7.0% 14,467,000 14,397,317 14,532,513
Total Including Special Warrants 4,026,040,100 108,772,500 2.8% 3,917,267,600 3,933,504,423 3,683,627,949
Less: Special Warrants 0 0 0 0 0
Total to be Voted 4,026,040,100 108,772,500 2.8% 3,917,267,600 3,933,504,423 3,683,627,949
Special Warrants 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory Appropriations 157,414 (94,900) (37.6%) 252,314 127,577 110,552
Ministry Total Operating and Capital 4,026,197,514 108,677,600 2.8% 3,917,519,914 3,933,632,000 3,683,738,501
Consolidation (94,728,200) (2,628,200) 2.9% (92,100,000) (96,932,671) (95,101,510)
Ministry Total Operating and Captial
including Consolidation
3,931,469,314 106,049,400 2.8% 3,825,419,914 3,836,699,329 3,588,636,991

Assets (Operating and Capital)

Votes/Programs Estimates
2011—2012
Change from Estimates
2010—2011
Estimate
2010—2011
Interim Actuals
2010—2011
Actuals
2009—2010
$ $ % $ $ $
Children and Youth Services 2,326,000 (2,043,000) (46.8%) 4,369,000 209,683 368,107
Total Ministry Assets 2,326,000 (2,043,000) (46.8%) 4,369,000 209,683 368,107
Less: Special Warrants 0 0 0 0 0
Total Assets to be Voted 2,326,000 (2,043,000) (46.8%) 4,369,000 209,683 368,107
* Amounts have been restated for transfers of funding to Ministry of Education and Ministry of Attorney General.

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Appendix I: Annual Report 2010-11

Ministry Achievements in 2010-11

Healthy Child Development (formerly called Early Learning and Child Development)

Early Years Community Support

In 2010-11, the ministry continued to support early healthy child development through:

The Enhanced 18-Month Well-Baby Visit was launched in May 2010. During this visit, the child’s primary health care provider, using standardized tools, in a collaborative discussion with parents, conducts a developmental evaluation, speaks with parents about their child’s development and about community programs that will help prepare their child for school.

The ministry took the next steps toward establishing Best Start Child and Family Centres in communities across Ontario - a key recommendation of Dr. Charles Pascal, the government’s advisor on early learning. These centres will provide parents with easy access to services that support early child development such as information, parenting supports, language, vision and literacy programs, child care, early identification, screening and intervention, and play-based learning programs. In early 2011, Dr. Pascal, Minister Broten and local MPPs hosted community engagement meetings across the province to learn about the current experiences of families receiving children’s services. The ministry also invited Ontarians to provide their ideas on improving children’s services online.

The ministry continued to support 107 Ontario Early Years Centres and a number of satellite centres. These centres offer formal and informal drop-in programs and services, such as parenting and nutrition workshops. And the ministry continued to fund the Student Nutrition Program to help more children and youth - especially those in high-needs neighbourhoods - get a healthy breakfast, lunch or snack so they are ready to learn in school. In 2010, the program served an estimated 600,000 kids across Ontario.

Child Care

Responsibility for child care was transferred from the Ministry of Children and Youth Services to the Ministry of Education in 2010-11. Policy and program responsibilities were transferred in the spring. Funding and contract management responsibilities followed in the fall. Bringing child care and education together under one ministry will create a more integrated system that will result in smoother transitions for young children and their families.

The ministry continued to be responsible for licensing and inspecting child care programs. In 2010-11, there were approximately 4,800 child care centres and 135 private-home day care agencies operating in Ontario.

Children and Youth at Risk

Child Protection Services

Ontario’s child protection services help children and youth who have been, or are at risk of being, abused or neglected, grow up in safe, stable, caring environments. Fifty-three children’s aid societies (CASs), including six Aboriginal CASs, protect children and help place them for adoption. As a result of government efforts over the last several years, fewer kids came into care in 2010-11 and more kids got the chance to succeed in permanent homes.

The Commission to Promote Sustainable Child Welfare continued to work with CASs and the government to find solutions that will help the child protection system remain sustainable and best meet the needs of the kids it serves. The Commission identified a number of CASs that can deliver more accessible and affordable child welfare services and outlined a plan to reconfigure these organizations. These agencies are expected to share their amalgamation plans with the Commission in early 2011.

In 2010-11, the ministry began developing the Child Protection Information Network (CPIN), part of the government’s plan to modernize the child protection system so vulnerable kids and their families can continue to get the services they need. CPIN will provide all children’s aid societies with the information they need in one place. It will help agencies more easily manage case files and finances, share information with each other and make decisions for the children they serve.

At the beginning of the fiscal year, children’s aid societies received an additional $25.1 million compared to their 2009-10 allocations. The six Aboriginal CASs received $8.5 million to meet their unique needs and $16.6 million was made available to other CASs for child welfare transformation priorities. In March 2011, the ministry provided $38 million in one-time funding to CASs to address in-year deficits, service volume changes, Section 14 reviews and amalgamation activities. The ministry also provided $7.3 million in conditional grants to 15 CASs actively engaged in amalgamation planning to eliminate their historic debts.

John Beaucage, a former Grand Council Chief of the Anishinabek Nation, was appointed Aboriginal Advisor to the Minister of Children and Youth Services. In this role, Mr. Beaucage helped guide discussions with Aboriginal leaders and front-line service providers on child welfare issues and provided advice to the minister on Aboriginal child welfare policy matters.

Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption

The government continued to examine the recommendations made by the Expert Panel on Infertility and Adoption to make fertility treatment and adoption more accessible and affordable. In 2010-11, Minister Broten met with CASs, adoption workers, adoptive parents and children in care to get their advice on the recommendations.

The ministry provided an eight per cent increase in adoption service funding for CASs as part of its efforts to increase the number of stable, permanent homes for Ontario’s Crown wards. Approximately 1,000 adoptions were completed in Ontario in 2010-11.

Child Poverty

Ontario’s first-ever poverty reduction strategy, ‘Breaking the Cycle’, was released in December 2008. It set a target of reducing child poverty by 25 per cent over five years.

In December 2010, the government released the second annual report on its strategy. The report details progress made over the past two years to stimulate Ontario’s economic recovery and to help children and families hit hardest by the global recession. Highlights include:

Ontario Child Benefit

The Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) - the centrepiece of the government’s poverty reduction strategy - is a non-taxable benefit that helps low-income families provide for their children. To be considered for the benefit, individuals need to file their annual income taxes and register their child for the Canada Child Tax Benefit. In 2010-11, the OCB helped more than one million kids and their families.

The ministry also provided funding equivalent to the maximum OCB to children and youth in the care of children’s aid societies. This funding helped provide supports such as tutoring, skills building and recreational programs to all children and youth in care. Older youth also participated in a savings program to help them prepare for independence and the transition to adulthood. These youth will have access to their savings when they leave care.

Youth Policy Framework

The Review of the Roots of Youth Violence Report, released in 2008, called on the government to develop a plan to better align youth-serving programs across all levels of government and across all sectors.

In 2010-11, the ministry started to engage youth and youth organizations from across the province to help in the development of a Youth Policy Framework. This included the creation of a Youth Development Committee made up of 25 young Ontarians with different backgrounds and lived experiences to share their thoughts and ideas. The framework will help families, communities, service providers and decision-makers better understand what young people need to succeed.

Child and Youth Mental Health

The ministry continued working in 2010-11 to create a mental health system that delivers the right services and supports to children and youth when they need them, as close to home as possible. Mental health services for children and youth are delivered through more than 260 child and youth mental health agencies, 17 hospital-based outpatient programs, two directly-operated child and youth mental health centres and on-site clinical supports at seven directly-operated secure custody/detention facilities for youth in conflict with the law.

Aboriginal children and youth in urban and off-reserve communities across Ontario continued to benefit from programs that help them build confidence and make healthy choices. Two examples are the Akwe:go Urban Aboriginal Children’s Program, which helps kids seven to 12 and the Wasa-Nabin Urban Aboriginal Youth Program, which benefits youth 13 to 18.

The Nishnawbe-Aski Nation (NAN) Youth Resiliency Program, a suicide prevention program, continued to provide culture-based, community-driven mental heath and community capacity building activities for children and youth nine to 16 years of age in ten Nan First Nations. The program is offered in two streams: Girl Power for females; and Wolf Spirit for males.

The Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health continued its work to improve the quality and effectiveness of child and youth mental health services through the promotion of evidence-based practices and knowledge transfer with front-line service providers. In 2010, the ministry entered into a new contract with the centre that includes a refocused mandate to support front-line staff at child and youth mental health agencies in delivering high quality and effective services that draw upon the best available evidence.

The Ontario Child and Youth Telepsychiatry Program continued providing clinical consultations (psychiatric assessments and treatment recommendations) through video-conferencing to a range of designated child and youth mental health agencies and to the children and youth receiving services from them in rural, remote and under-served areas of the province.

The ministry’s Working Together for Kids’ Mental Health initiative continued to engage four communities in order to study how schools, health settings and community-based mental health agencies work together to identify kids’ needs earlier and support them in getting the right help at the right time. These communities were provided with screening and assessment tools and training to enhance timely decision-making when mental health issues are first noticed.

The Student Support Leadership Initiative - a joint project with the Ministries of Education and Health and Long-Term Care - continued promoting partnerships among school boards, the health sector and child and youth mental health agencies to improve outcomes for at-risk students.

The Child and Youth Mental Health Extraordinary Circumstances reserve continued to provide time-limited support to ministry-funded agencies in communities that experienced an unusual event that significantly impacted the mental health of children and youth in the community. In 2010-11, the Extraordinary Circumstances Reserve committed funding to initiatives to support children and youth of military families; children and youth in communities experiencing high rates of suicide; and children and youth from Aboriginal communities with significantly elevated levels of mental health needs.

The ministry continued to work closely with the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and other ministries on the development of a comprehensive, 10-year mental health and addictions strategy that will lead to better services for Ontarians.

Youth Justice Services

The goals of youth justice services are to reduce re-offending, contribute to community safety and prevent youth crime through rehabilitative programming, holding youth accountable and creating opportunities for youth at risk. By helping youth make better choices and lessening the likelihood they will re-offend, Ontario is making communities safer while giving youth a better opportunity to succeed.

The ministry’s transformation of youth justice services has reduced the use of custody and increased the use of evidence-based community programs and partnerships, including programming for Aboriginal youth and youth with specialized or mental health needs. Generally, less than six per cent of youth charged or found guilty of an offence are placed in custody/detention. The majority of youth in conflict with the law receive service/supervision through a broad range of community programs, including diversion from formal court proceedings, rehabilitation, probation, alternatives to custody and supports for mental health issues.

Youth placed in custody/detention have the opportunity to participate in rehabilitative programs that will help them develop the skills they need to achieve success in the community. Programs include skills development, substance abuse counselling, life skills programs and anger management. Youth also have the opportunity to form positive relationships. Staff working in custody facilities practices a form of supervision known as ‘relationship custody’, where they enforce rules and procedures as well as coach, mentor and engage youth in decision-making. The ministry is committed to ongoing evaluation of programs and services so they remain effective in supporting youth rehabilitation and reducing the risk that youth will re-offend.

Youth Opportunities Strategy

In 2010-11, the Youth Opportunities Strategy, part of Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, helped young people faced with significant challenges reach their full potential and achieve individual success.

Through the program:

Youthconnect.ca continued to provide information about these programs and other resources available to youth.

Residential Services

Children and youth may come into residential care through a court order for child protection or as a result of being in conflict with the law. Other children may require residential care due to developmental and physical challenges, medically-fragile conditions, behavioural difficulties, psychiatric disorders or substance abuse.

Residential care is provided through group or foster care settings. In 2010-11, the ministry continued to fund more than 4,900 beds in 545 group homes, 12,000 beds in more than 8,200 foster homes, and more than 1,200 beds for youth in conflict with the law.

Ontario continued to make progress supporting residential services that emphasize safety and give kids in care the opportunity to achieve their potential. Screening of people applying to work with vulnerable children has been enhanced; food and nutrition standards have improved; culturally-appropriate programs and environments are now offered; and new requirements are being implemented to ensure the safe administration of psychotropic medications.

Services and Supports for Aboriginal Children and Youth

The ministry continued to take action in 2010-11 to strengthen services and supports for Aboriginal kids living on- and off-reserve across the province.

John Beaucage, a former Grand Council Chief of the Anishinabek Nation, was appointed Aboriginal Advisor to the Minister of Children and Youth Services. In this role, Mr. Beaucage helped guide discussions with Aboriginal leaders and front-line service providers on child welfare issues and provided advice to the minister on Aboriginal child welfare policy matters.

In addition to increasing annual funding to the six Aboriginal children’s aid societies, the ministry continued to meet the unique needs of Aboriginal young people by supporting the Aboriginal Healthy Babies Healthy Children Program, the Aboriginal Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and Child Nutrition Program, the Akwe:go and Wasa-Nabin Urban Aboriginal Programs and community-based programs for Aboriginal youth in conflict with the law.

The ministry is currently working with a number of Aboriginal service providers that are seeking designation as Aboriginal Children’s Aid Societies. In 2010-11, the ministry provided $3 million in funding to Aboriginal service providers to assist them with capacity building during the designation process.

Specialized Services

Children’s Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

Children’s Treatment Centres (CTCs) provide rehabilitation services to children and youth up to 19 years of age with physical and/or developmental disabilities, chronic illness and/or communication disorders. CTCs provide core rehabilitation services including physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech and language therapy. A variety of other services and clinics – such as autism, preschool speech and language, respite and developmental programs - are offered depending on local needs and the mix of providers in each community.

There are 21 CTCs in Ontario, 20 of which are funded by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services. Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital is funded by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care because it provides in-patient services. According to the Ontario Association of Children’s Rehabilitation Services (OACRS), CTCs serve approximately 60,000 children each year.

In April 2010, the ministry announced an additional $9 million in annual base funding for the 20 CTCs to provide more services for children and youth on waiting lists. OACRS estimated this new funding would benefit an additional 3,600 children and youth with special needs each year. In addition, the ministry provided a one-time investment of $2.5 million to 12 CTCs to help improve their clinical information systems.

The ministry continued to fund respite services for families with children who are medically-fragile, technology- dependent or who have multiple special needs. Services are provided in the family home or in a setting outside the home, such as a group home.

Services and Supports for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

In December 2010, the ministry announced that it is increasing its annual investment in autism by $25 million to broaden the range of supports to children and youth with ASD and their families. Approximately 8,000 kids are expected to benefit each year from new Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA)-based services, starting in late spring 2011. These services will help children and youth with ASD become more independent, develop communication, social and daily living skills, and cope better in school.

The ministry announced it will expand existing supports for parents of children with ASD and establish an ASD clinical expert committee by fall 2011 to provide advice on effective interventions, emerging research and best clinical practices. The committee will promote transparency in clinical decision-making and will help ensure that kids with ASD get the right supports at the right time.

The ministry also announced it will establish an independent review mechanism for the Autism Intervention Program. If a family is not satisfied with a decision related to their child’s eligibility for, or discharge from, IBI services, or a decision to reduce the length or intensity of service their child receives, they will be able to request an independent review.

Across the province, approximately 1,100 kids with autism experienced the joys of summer camp and more than 600 children and youth participated in 2011 March break camps. These camps give kids with autism the opportunity to make new friends and the chance to participate in fun activities such as swimming, arts and crafts, bowling, skating and music. In November, the ministry announced that it is making funding for March Break camps permanent.

The College Graduate Certificate Program in Autism and Behavioural Science – developed by the ministry in collaboration with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities - continued to increase the pool of qualified professionals to work with children and youth with ASD.

The ministry continued to fund respite services for families caring for a child with autism and it continued to work with the Ministry of Education to implement Connections for Students, a program that establishes transition teams in all 72 school boards across the province to support children leaving the Autism Intervention Program and starting or continuing in a publicly-funded school

Capital Investments in Social Service Facilities

Investing in infrastructure is a critical part of Ontario’s plan to restore growth, save and create jobs in the short term, and build foundations for the future.

In 2010-11, the ministry invested $10.1 million for approximately 260 projects to help social service agencies better serve children, youth and their families. Projects included expansions and renovations that improved security, accessibility and energy efficiency at agency facilities that deliver ministry services.

Ministry Interim Expenditures ($M) 2010-11
Operating 3,919
Capital 15
BPS Consolidation (97)
Staff Strength
(as of March 31, 2011)
2602 Full-time equivalents