E. An LGBT2SQ Self-Assessment Checklist for Child Welfare Workers and Caregivers Serving LGBT2SQ Children, Youth and Families

The National Center for Cultural Competence at Georgetown University has developed a comprehensive checklist, the Self-Assessment Checklist for Personnel Providing Services and Supports to LGBTQ Youth and Their Families— that is intended to heighten the awareness and sensitivity of child welfare workers to the importance of LGBT2SQ competency in service delivery. The checklist helps assess an individual’s own practices and to identify possible areas for new action and areas for improvement when delivering child welfare services to LGBT2SQ children, youth and families. The checklist covers the physical environment, materials and resources, communication practices, values, and attitudes. It provides concrete examples of the kinds of values and practices that foster LGBT2SQ competency.

The Self-Assessment Checklist for Personnel Providing Services and Supports to LGBTQ Youth and Their Families can be accessed through the National Center for Cultural Competence’s Website at:
https://nccc.georgetown.edu/documents/Final%20LGBTQ%20Checklist.pdf.

Note: The inclusion of this resource is intended as an example of a current tool that is publically available to assess an individual's competency in delivering child welfare services to LGBT2SQ children, youth and their families. Its use is not required by the Ministry of Children and Youth Services.

Rating Scale: Please select A, B, or C for each item listed below:
A = I do this frequently, or the statement applies to me to a great degree.
B = I do this occasionally, or the statement applies to me to a moderate degree.
C = I do this rarely or never, or the statement applies to me to a minimal degree or not at all.

SELF ASSESSMENT A B C
PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT, MATERIALS, AND RESOURCES
1. I display pictures, posters and other materials that are inclusive of LGBTQ youth and their families served by my program/agency. A B C
2. I ensure that LGBTQ youth and families across diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups:
  • have access to magazines, brochures, and other printed materials that are of interest to them
  • are reflected in media resources (e.g., videos, films, CDs, DVDS, Websites) for health and behavioral health prevention, treatment, or other interventions.
A B C
3. I ensure that printed/multimedia resources (e.g., photos, posters magazines, brochures, videos, films, CDs, Websites) are free of biased and negative content, language, or images about people who are LGBTQ A B C
4. I screen books, movies, and other media resources for negative stereotypes about LGBTQ persons before sharing them with youth and their parents/families served by my program/agency A B C
COMMUNICATION PRACTICES
5. I attempt to learn and use key words and terms that reflect 'youth culture' or LGBTQ youth culture, so that I communicate more effectively with youth during assessment, treatment, or other interventions. A B C
6. I understand and respect that some youth may:
  • choose not to identify as LGBTQ or prefer to use other terms to identify themselves.
  • abandon use of all terms associated with sexual orientation/gender identity or expression so as to remain "label-free."
A B C
7. I understand and apply the principles and practices of linguistic competence as they relate to LGBTQ populations within my program/agency, including the use of:
  • preferred gender pronoun(s).
  • preferred proper names.
  • terms that reflect self-identity about sexual orientation/gender identity.
A B C
8. I advocate for the use of linguistically appropriate terminology for LGBTQ populations within:
  • my program/agency.
  • systems that serve children, youth, and their families.
  • professional and community organizations with which I am associated.
A B C
VALUES AND ATTITUDES
9. I avoid imposing values that may conflict or be inconsistent with those of LGBTQ youth cultures or groups. A B C
10. In group therapy or treatment situations, I discourage the use of "hate speech" or slurs about sexual orientation/gender identity or expression by helping youth to understand that certain words can hurt others. A B C
11. I intervene appropriately when I observe others (i.e., staff, parents, family members, children, and youth) within my program/agency behave or speak about sexual orientation/gender identity or expression in ways that are insensitive, biased, or prejudiced. A B C
12. I understand and accept that family may be defined differently by LGBTQ youth (e.g., extended family members, families of choice, friends, partners, fictive kin, godparents). A B C
13. I accept that LGBTQ youth, parents/family members may not always agree about who will make decisions about services and supports for the youth. A B C
14. I recognize that LGBTQ identity has different connotations (negative, neutral, positive) within different racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. A B C
15. I accept that culture heavily influences responses by family members and others to youth who are LGBTQ, and to the provision of their care, treatment, services, and supports. A B C
16. I understand and respect that LGBTQ youth may conceal their sexual orientation/gender identity or expression within their own racial, ethnic, or cultural group. A B C
17. I accept and respect that LGBTQ youth may not express their gender according to culturally-defined societal expectations. A B C
18. I understand that age and life cycle factors, including identity development, must be considered when interacting with LGBTQ youth and their families. A B C
19. I recognize that the meaning or value of health and behavioral health prevention, intervention, and treatment may vary greatly among LGBTQ youth and their families. A B C
20. I understand that family members and others may believe that LGBTQ identity among youth is a mental illness, emotional disturbance/disability, or moral/character flaw. A B C
21. I understand the impact of stigma associated with mental illness, behavioral health services, and help-seeking behavior among LGBTQ youth and their families within cultural communities (e.g., communities defined by race or ethnicity, religiosity or spirituality, tribal affiliation, and/or geographic locale). A B C
22. I accept that religion, spirituality, and other beliefs may influence how families:
  • respond to a child or youth who identifies as LGBTQ.
  • view LGBTQ youth culture.
  • approach a child or youth who is LGBTQ.
A B C
23. I ensure that LGBTQ youth:
  • have appropriate access to events and activities conducted by my program/agency.
  • participate in training (i.e., panel presentations, workshops, seminars, and other forums).
  • participate on advisory boards, committees and task forces
A B C
24. I ensure that members of "families of choice" identified by LGBTQ youth:
  • have appropriate access to events and activities conducted by my program/agency.
  • participate in training (i.e., panel presentations, workshops, seminars, and other forums).
  • participate on advisory boards, committees and task forces.
A B C
25. Before visiting or providing services and supports in the home setting, I seek information on acceptable behaviors, courtesies, customs, and expectations that are unique to:
  • LGBTQ youth and their families.
  • LGBTQ headed families.
A B C
26. I confer with LGBTQ youth, family members, key community informants, cultural brokers, and those who are knowledgeable about LGBTQ youth experience to:
  • create or adapt service delivery models.
  • implement services and supports.
  • evaluate services and supports.
  • plan community awareness, acceptance, and engagement initiatives.
A B C
27. I advocate for the periodic review of the mission, policies, and procedures of my program/agency to ensure the full inclusion of all individuals regardless of their sexual orientation/gender identity or expression. A B C
28. I keep abreast of new developments in the research and practice literatures about appropriate interventions and approaches for working with LGBTQ youth and their families. A B C
29. I accept that many evidence-based prevention and intervention approaches will require adaptation to be effective with LGBTQ youth and their families. A B C