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Stepping Up: A Strategic Framework to Help Ontario's Youth Succeed

Appendix: Ontario's Profile of Youth Wellbeing Source Material


Health and Wellness

1. Ontario youth are physically healthy.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are a healthy weight

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2013 – 77.9%; 2014 – 76.7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario youth (aged 12–17) who self-rated their weight as neither overweight nor obese. This variable classifies children aged 12–17 (except female respondents aged 15–17 who were pregnant or did not answer the pregnancy question) as "obese," "overweight" or "neither obese nor overweight" according to the age-and-sex specific BMI cut-off points as defined by Cole et al.25 The Cole cut-off points are based on pooled international data for BMI and linked to the widely internationally accepted adult BMI cut-off points of 25 (overweight) and 30 (obese).

Source: This data is based on the responses to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), conducted by Statistics Canada. Data presented here is based on survey responses from 2014. The CCHS is conducted every year.

Sample: 1,690 youth aged 12–17 responded to the CCHS 2014 – representing a population of 969,500. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves and some remote communities.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2013 – 77.9%; 2014 – 76.7%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are physically active

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2013 – 70.5%; 2014 – 68%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario youth (aged 12–19) who reported that during their leisure time they were active or moderately active.

Source: This data is based on the responses to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), conducted by Statistics Canada. Data presented here is based on survey responses from 2014. The CCHS is conducted every year.

Sample: 2,230 youth aged 12–19 responded to the CCHS 2014 – representing a population of 1,293,500. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves and some remote communities.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2013 – 70.5%; 2014 – 68%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who consume at least five servings of fruit or vegetables daily

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 42.9%; 2014 – 41.3%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario youth (aged 12–19) who reported that they consumed less than five daily servings of fruit or vegetables.

Source: This data is based on the responses to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), conducted by Statistics Canada. Data presented here is based on survey responses from 2013. The CCHS is conducted every year.

Sample: 2,230 youth aged 12–19 responded to the CCHS 2014 – representing a population of 1,293,500. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves and some remote communities.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2013 – 42.9%; 2014 – 41.3%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are attached to a primary care provider.

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2013 – 90.1%; 2014 – 91.0%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario youth (aged 16–25) who reported having a primary health care provider.

Source: This data is based on the responses to the 2014 Health Care Experience Survey (HCES), conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The HCES is a voluntary telephone survey aimed at Ontarians aged 16 and older. Data was collected between January and December 2014.

Sample: 871 youth aged 16–25 responded to the survey,representing 7.8% of all respondents aged 16 and older.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2013 – 90.1%; 2014 – 91.0%


2. Ontario youth feel mentally well.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are experiencing anxiety and/or depression

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 - 4.2%; 2012 - 6%; 2013 - 6%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported anxiety/depression symptoms experienced during the past four weeks.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 - 4.2%; 2012 - 6%; 2013 - 6%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are experiencing elevated psychological distress

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 - 31%; 2011 - 33.6%; 2013 - 26%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported experiencing a moderate to high level of psychological distress in the past month.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 - 31%; 2011 - 33.6%; 2013 - 26%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who had serious thoughts about suicide in the past year.

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 – 9.5%; 2011 – 10.3%; 2013 – 13.4%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported they had seriously contemplated suicide in the past year.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 – 9.5%; 2011 – 10.3%; 2013 – 13.4%

3. Ontario youth make choices that support healthy and safe development.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who smoke cigarettes

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 – 11.7%; 2011 – 8.7%; 2013 – 8.5%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported smoking cigarettes during the 12 months before the survey.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 – 11.7%; 2011 – 8.7%; 2013 – 8.5%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who have recently consumed excessive alcohol

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 – 24.7%; 2011 – 22.3%; 2013 - 19.8%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported binge drinking (drinking five or more drinks on one occasion) at least once during the four weeks before the survey.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 – 24.7%; 2011 – 22.3%; 2013 - 19.8%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who have used any illicit drug

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 - 30.7%

Definition: This indicator is a composite of Ontario students (Grades 9–12) who reported non-medical drug use of cannabis, LSD, mushrooms/methamphetamine, cocaine, crack, heroin, ecstasy, stimulants (non-medical) and tranquilizers/sedatives (non-medical) in the past year. This indicator excludes the use of alcohol, tobacco, high-caffeine energy drinks, inhalants, jimson weed, salvia, ketamine, OxyContin and other prescription opioid pain relievers, prescription ADHD drugs, over-the-counter medication and steroids.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2013 - 30.7%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who have had a sexually transmitted infection

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2010 - 3.9%; 2014 – 2.6%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario youth (aged 12–24) who replied that they had been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection at least once.

Source: This data is based on the responses to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), conducted by Statistics Canada. Data presented here is based on survey responses from 2014. The CCHS is conducted every year.

Sample: 3,809 youth aged 12–24 responded to the CCHS 2014 – representing a population of 2,281,583. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves and some remote communities.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2010 - 3.9%; 2014 – 2.6%


Strong, Supportive Friends and Families

4. Ontario youth have families and guardians equipped to help them thrive.

Indicator: Proportion of families who live in deep poverty and are struggling to afford housing

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 – 5.0%, 2010 – 4.2%, 2011 – 5.1%

Definition: The Ontario Housing Measure tracks the percentage of households with children under 18 that have incomes below 40% of the median household income (LIM40) and spend more than 40% of their income on housing.

Source: This data is based on responses to the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, conducted by Statistics Canada. The most recent data is from 2011, released in June 2013. The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics is no longer active. Statistics Canada has not yet released a replacement survey that measures and tracks income/poverty. Once this has been done, the relevant indicators will be incorporated into the profile.

Sample: Approximately 10,000 Ontarians.

Desired Direction: Down

Desired Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 – 5.0%, 2010 – 4.2%, 2011 – 5.1%

Indicator: Proportion of Ontario families who experience food insecurity

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2011/12 – 10%

Definition: The Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) defines "food insecurity" as a household’s ability to afford the food it needs over the past 12 months. This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario households with children that are food insecure.

Source: This data is based on the responses to the CCHS, conducted by Statistics Canada. Data presented here is based on responses to the 2014 survey. The CCHS is conducted every year. Excluded from the CCHS are residents of First Nations reserves, health care institutions, some remote areas and fulltime members of the Canadian Forces.

Sample: This sample includes Ontario households with children aged 0–17.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2011/12 – 10%

Indicator: Proportion of children and youth who live in low-income households

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 – 14.6%; 2010 – 13.8%; 2011 – 13.6%

Definition: Low income is defined using Ontario’s "fixed" LIM50. It is the number and percentage of people living in a household with an after-tax income less than 50% of the median adjusted household income measured in 2008 and adjusted for inflation for 2009–11. The after-tax threshold varies according to household size.

Source: This data is based on responses to the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, conducted by Statistics Canada. The most recent data is from 2011, released in June 2013. The Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics is no longer active. Statistics Canada has not yet released a replacement survey that measures and tracks income/poverty. Once this has been done, the relevant indicators will be incorporated into the profile.

Sample: Approximately 16,000 individuals in approximately 7,000 families. The sample includes approximately 3,200 children and youth under the age of 18. Persons living in institutions, on First Nations reserves or in military barracks are excluded.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 – 14.6%; 2010 – 13.8%; 2011 – 13.6%


5. Ontario youth have at least one consistent, caring adult in their lives.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who have at least one parent who usually knows where they are

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 92.3%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported that at least one parent "always" or "usually" knows where they are when they are away from home.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2013 – 92.3%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who do not get along with their mothers

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 4.4%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported not getting along with their mothers.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2013 – 4.4%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who do not get along with their fathers

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 6.5%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported not getting along with their fathers.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2013 – 6.5%


6. Ontario youth form and maintain healthy, close relationships.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who feel lonely

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2010 – 19.7%; 2014 – 24%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of youth (aged 11–15) who agreed or strongly agreed with thestatement "I often feel lonely."

Source: This data is based on responses to the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. The self-reported survey is administered every four years by the Social Program Evaluation Group at Queen’s University on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) and is funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Sample: 5,949 students, in Grades 6–10, from 81 Ontario schools.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2010 – 19.7%; 2014 – 24%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who feel they can count on their friends when things go wrong

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2014 - 74.7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of youth who agreed or strongly agreed with the statement "I can count on my friends when things go wrong."

Source: This data is based on responses to the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. The self-reported survey is administered every four years by the Social Program Evaluation Group at Queen’s University on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) and is funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Sample: 5,949 students, in Grades 6–10, from 81 Ontario schools.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement Indicator

Data: 2014 – 74.7%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who get the emotional support they need from their families

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2014 - 65.4%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of youth who agreed or strongly agreed with the statement "I get the emotional support and help I need from my family."

Source: This data is based on responses to the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. The self-reported survey is administered every four years by the Social Program Evaluation Group at Queen’s University on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) and is funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Sample: 5,949 students, in Grades 6–10, from 81 Ontario schools.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement Indicator

Data: 2014 – 65.4%


Education, Training and Apprenticeships

7. Ontario youth achieve academic success.

Indicator: Proportion of English-speaking / French-speaking students enrolled in academic math who meet the provincial standard

Graphic of a bar graph showing English: 2010/11 – 83%, 2011/12 – 84%, 2012/2013 – 84%, 2013/2014 – 85% - French: 2010/11 – 70%, 2011/12 - 78%, 2012/2013 – 81%, 2013/2014 – 84%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students meeting the provincial standard in academic math. Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) results are scored on a scale out of 4, with 3 or above being defined as meeting the provincial standard.

Please note: In the 2014 Stepping Up Annual Report, the 2012–13 data for this indicator were reported incorrectly. The correct data are 84% for English-speaking students and 81% for French-speaking students. The electronic version of the 2014 Stepping Up Annual Report has been revised to reflect the correct information.

Source: The tests are administered and the data is compiled by the EQAO. EQAO tests are administered for Grade 9 students in math only.

Sample: The 2013–14 Grade 9 Academic Assessment was administered to 95,914 English-speaking students and 4,051 French-speaking students. Data excludes students attending school on First Nations reserves.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: English: 2010/11 – 83%, 2011/12 – 84%, 2012/13 – 84%, 2013/14 – 85%

French: 2010/11 – 70%, 2011/12 - 78%, 2012/13 – 81%, 2013/14 – 84%

Indicator: Proportion of English-speaking / French-speaking students enrolled in applied math who meet the provincial standard

Graphic of a bar graph showing English: 2010/11 - 42%, 2011/12 - 44%, 2012/2013 – 44%, 2013/2014 – 47% - French: 2010/11 - 37%, 2011/12 - 44%, 2012/2013 – 51%, 2013/2014 – 51%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students meeting the provincial standard in applied math. Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) results are scored on a scale out of 4, with 3 or above being defined as meeting the provincial standard.

Please note: In the 2014 Stepping Up Annual Report, the 2012–13 data for this indicator were reported incorrectly. The correct data are 44% for English-speaking students and 51% for French-speaking students. The electronic version of the 2014 Stepping Up Annual Report has been revised to reflect the correct information.

Source: The tests are administered and the data is compiled by the EQAO. EQAO tests are administered for Grade 9 students in math only.

Sample: The 2013–14 Grade 9 Applied Assessment was administered to 38,181 English-speaking students and 1,530 French-speaking students. Data excludes students attending school on First Nations reserves.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: English: 2010/11 - 42%, 2011/12 - 44%, 2012/13 – 44%, 2013/14 – 47%

French: 2010/11 - 37%, 2011/12 - 44%, 2012/13 – 51%, 2013/14 – 51%

Indicator: Proportion of English-speaking / French-speaking students who completed 16 high school credits by the end of Grade 10

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2012/13 – 77%, 2013/14 – 88% - French: 2012/13 – 78%, 2013/14 – 88%

Definition: The Grade 10 Credit Accumulation indicator is the percentage of students who accumulated 16 or more credits after two years of secondary school out of the total number of students who completed two years of secondary school. Research shows that the successful completion of 16 credits by the end of Grade 10 keeps students on track to graduate with their peers.

Source: This data is sourced from the Ontario School Information System (OnSIS). Data presented for 2013–14 is based on students’ Grade 9 (in 2012–13) and Grade 10 (in 2013–14) course credits. Data presented for 2012–13 is based on students’ Grade 9 (in 2011–12) and Grade 10 (in 2012–13) course credits.

Sample: The data includes all students who were enrolled in a publicly funded secondary school at the end of their Grade 9 and Grade 10 school years.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2012/13 – 77%, 2013/14 – 88%

French: 2012/13 – 78%, 2013/14 – 88%

Indicator: Proportion of high school students who graduate within five years

2010/11 – 82%, 2011/12 – 83%, 2012/13 – 83%, 2013/14 – 84%

Definition: The percentage of students from a five-year cohort who achieved their high school diploma.

Source: This data is based on data reported by school boards to the Ontario School Information System (OnSIS) for the 2013–14 school year.

Sample: The data includes the cohort of students who started Grade 9 five years prior (in 2009–10). Data excludes students attending school on First Nations reserves.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2010/11 – 82%, 2011/12 – 83%, 2012/13 – 83%, 2013/14 – 84%

Indicator: Ontario’s overall mathematics achievement ranking according to PISA

Graphic of the number 9

Definition: This indicator is defined as Ontario’s ranking among jurisdictions that participated in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) for overall mathematics achievement.

Source: PISA is an international study conducted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) that measures the abilities of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematics and science. Conducted every three years, each assessment has one major focus among the three subjects; in 2012, the major domain was mathematics.

Excluded from the assessment are students with a moderate to severe permanent physical disability; students with an intellectual disability; and students with limited proficiency in the assessment language.

Sample: 65 countries and economies took part in the 2012 PISA. 147 of Ontario’s schools participated, representing 3,699 students. Of those students, 2,353 were from the English-language school system, and 1,346 were from the French-language school system.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2012 — Ranked 9 out of 65 jurisdictions.


8. Ontario youth have educational experiences that respond to their needs and prepare them to lead.

Indicator: Proportion of youth enrolled in the Specialist High Skills Major program

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2010/11 – 7.2%; 2011/12 – 9.2%; 2012/13 – 9.8%; 2013/14 – 12%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Grade 11 and 12 students enrolled in the Specialist High Skills Major program out of the total number of students enrolled in Grades 11 and 12 in Ontario publicly funded schools.

Source: This data is sourced from the data collected from school boards on students enrolled in the Specialist High Skills Major program as well as enrolment data collected through the Ontario School Information System (OnSIS). Data presented here is based on the 2013–14 school year.

Sample: The data represents all students who are enrolled in the Specialist High Skills Major program.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2010/11 – 7.2%; 2011/12 – 9.2%; 2012/13 – 9.8%; 2013/14 – 12%

Indicator: Number of students who have Individual Education Plans

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2010/11 – 290,197; 2011/12 – 296,705; 2012/13 – 309,384; 2013/14 – 310,555

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of students receiving special education programs and services who have Individual Education Plans. An increase in the number of students with Individual Education Plans indicates that a greater number of students with special education needs are receiving personalized and precise assessment and instruction based on their individual strengths and needs.

Source: This data is sourced from the Ontario School Information System (OnSIS). Data presented here is based on the 2011–12 to 2013–14 school years.

Sample: The data includes students enrolled in publicly funded schools including school authorities in Ontario who are receiving special education programs and services and have an Individual Education Plan in place.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2010/11 – 290,197; 2011/12 – 296,705; 2012/13 – 309,384; 2013/14 – 310,555

Indicator: Proportion of high school course credits that are available through e-learning

Graphic of a bar graph showing Public: 2015/16 – 33.5%; Catholic: 2015/16 – 30.1%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of e-learning credits in relation to the total number of course credits available in the Ontario secondary school curriculum at both public and Catholic school districts.

Source: This data is based on the number of e-learning course credits that are available in the 2015–16 school year according to administrative data on credit courses listed in the Ontario secondary curriculum. Of the 299 secondary school credit courses that are being offered, 100 are designed for use in public school boards and 90 are designed for use in Catholic school boards.

Sample: This data is reported for the 2015–16 school year by the Ministry of Education. It includes the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course and the Math Transfer Course, and excludes locally developed, focus or emphasis courses.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement indicator.

Data: Public: 2015/16 – 33.5%; Catholic: 2015/16 – 30.1%

Please note: This indicator is identified as a a replacement indicator due to a change in methodology.

9. Ontario youth access diverse training and apprenticeship opportunities.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who have a postsecondary certificate or diploma

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2014/15 – 11.5%

Definition: The share of youth aged 15–24 who have completed postsecondary education—either university or college credentials, or trade/vocational education.

Source: Statistics Canada: Labour Force Survey (LFS).

Sample: The target population of the LFS is the civilian, noninstitutionalized population aged 15 years and over. Since July 1995, the monthly LFS sample size has been approximately 54,000 households, resulting in the collection of labour market information for approximately 100,000 individuals. It should be noted that the LFS sample size is subject to change from time to time in order to meet data quality or budget requirements. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement indicator.

Data: 2014/15 – 11.5%

Indicator: Number of youth served through the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2010/11 - 21,212, 2011/12 - 19,600, 2012/13 - 24,209, 2013/14 - 24,849, 2014/15 - 21,588

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of annual participants in the Ontario Youth Apprenticeship Program (OYAP). Participants are full-time high school students who are aged 16 and over and have at least 16 credits.

Additional OYAP funding has been provided to school boards since 2012–13 to promote trades in which women are historically under-represented, and increase awareness and opportunities for exploration to girls in both elementary and high schools.

Source: Program administrative data for the 2014–15 school year is collected by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

Sample: All annual OYAP participants.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2010/11 - 21,212, 2011/12 - 19,600, 2012/13 - 24,209, 2013/14 - 24,849, 2014/15 - 21,588


Employment and Entrepreneurship

10. Ontario youth have opportunities for meaningful employment experiences.

Indicator: Proportion of students who are enrolled in co-op placements

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2011/12 – 12.1%; 2013/14 – 12%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of students who are enrolled in co-operative education courses out of the total number of students enrolled in Ontario secondary schools (Grades 9–12).

Source: This data is sourced from the Ontario School Information System (OnSIS). Data presented here is based on the 2013–14 school year.

Sample: The data includes all students in publicly funded secondary schools in Grades 9–12 who took co-operative education courses throughout the school year.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2011/12 – 12.1%; 2013/14 – 12%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are in the labour force

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2011 – 61.8%; 2012 – 60.1%; 2013 – 60.8%; 2014 – 61.9%

Definition: This indicator is defined as a percentage of the youth population (aged 15–24) that is in the labour force.

Source: This data is based on the 2014 Labour Force Survey (LFS), which provides estimates of employment and unemployment. Both monthly and annual data on this indicator are available for the period 1976–2013. Data collection for the LFS is carried out each month during the week following the LFS reference week. The reference week is normally the week containing the 15th day of the month.

Sample: The target population of the LFS is the civilian, noninstitutionalized population aged 15 years and over. Since July 1995, the monthly LFS sample size has been approximately 54,000 households, resulting in the collection of labour market information for approximately 100,000 individuals. It should be noted that the LFS sample size is subject to change from time to time in order to meet data quality or budget requirements. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2011 – 61.8%; 2012 – 60.1%; 2013 – 60.8%; 2014 – 61.9%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are not in education, employment or training

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2011 – 9.0%; 2012 – 9.5%; 2013 – 9.4%; 2014 – 9.5%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of youth (aged 15–24) who are not students, and at the same time are not employed. It is calculated as the proportion of non-student youth who are not in the labour force out of the total youth population.

Source: This data is based on the 2014 Labour Force Survey (LFS), which provides estimates of employment and unemployment. Both monthly and annual data on this indicator are available for the period 1976–2013. Data collection for the LFS is carried out each month during the week following the LFS reference week. The reference week is normally the week containing the 15th day of the month.

Sample: The target population of the LFS is the civilian, noninstitutionalized population aged 15 years and over. Since July 1995, the monthly LFS sample size has been approximately 54,000 households, resulting in the collection of labour market information for approximately 100,000 individuals. It should be noted that the LFS sample size is subject to change from time to time in order to meet data quality or budget requirements. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2011 – 9.0%; 2012 – 9.5%; 2013 – 9.4%; 2014 – 9.5%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are employed fulltime in work related to their field

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 88.6%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of students who graduated from undergraduate programs at Ontario universities in 2011 who reported that that their full-time employment was either closely or somewhat related to the skills they developed at university.

Source: This data is based on the 2013 Grad Survey conducted by the Council of Ontario Universities. The Grad Survey is conducted annually with university graduates at six months and at two years post-graduation.

Sample: 72,429 students who graduated from undergraduate programs at Ontario universities in 2011 were surveyed, with 25,119 (34.7%) responding. Data was collected between November 2013 and March 2014.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement indicator.

Data: 2013 – 88.6%


11. Ontario youth have the skills and resources needed to develop a successful career or business.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who are self-employed

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 1.9%; 2014 – 1.7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of youth (aged 15–24) who reported that they were self-employed.

Source: This data is based on the 2014 Labour Force Survey (LFS), which collects information about employment and unemployment. Data collection for the LFS is carried out each month during the week following the LFS reference week. The reference week is normally the week containing the 15th day of the month.

Sample: The target population of the LFS is the civilian, noninstitutionalized population aged 15 years and over. Since July 1995, the monthly LFS sample size has been approximately 54,000 households, resulting in the collection of labour market information for approximately 100,000 individuals. It should be noted that the LFS sample size is subject to change from time to time in order to meet data quality or budget requirements. The data presented here is based on a sample of 34,200 Ontario youth, aged 15–24. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2013 – 1.9%; 2014 – 1.7%


12. Ontario youth are safe and supported at work.

Indicator: Annual WSIB Lost-Time Injury (LTI) rate for youth employees

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2013 – 1%, 2011 – 0.93%

Definition: The Lost-Time Injury (LTI) rate is defined as the number of Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) allowed lost-time injury and illness claims per 100 Full-Time Equivalent workers.

Source: This data is based on calculations from the Data Management and Performance Metrics Unit, Prevention Office, Ministry of Labour, using the standard WSIB LTI formula.

Sample: Youth employees aged 15–24, who work both full and part-time.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2013 – 1%, 2011 – 0.93%


Diversity, Social Inclusion and Safety

13. Ontario youth experience social inclusion and value diversity.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who feel a sense of belonging in their community

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2013 – 77%; 2014 – 78.7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario youth (aged 12–19) who described their sense of belonging to their local community as strong or somewhat strong.

Source: This data is based on the responses to the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), conducted by Statistics Canada. Data presented here is based on survey responses from 2014. The CCHS is conducted every year.

Sample: 2,230 youth aged 12–19 responded to the CCHS 2014, representing a population of 1,293,500. Data collection excludes First Nations reserves and some remote communities.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2013 – 77%; 2014 – 78.7%

Indicator: Proportion of students who have positive attitudes toward diversity at school

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2011 – 87.8%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the percentage of students who answered "yes" when asked “Do you think that a student wanting to establish a Gay-Straight Alliance club in their school should be allowed to do so?"

Source: This data is based on the 2011 Ontario Student & Parent Survey. The Ontario Student Trustees Association-l’Association des élèves conseillers et conseillères de l’Ontario (OSTA-AECO) conducts an annual student survey across Ontario schools to ensure that their voices are heard. Survey questions are proposed and selected by students across the province, reflecting issues important to them. Identified themes include technology, mental health and diversity. Questions change every year based on students’ attitudes to these important issues.

Sample: In 2011, 7,112 students from 70 of Ontario’s English, Catholic and French school boards—and all regions of the province—participated in the online survey.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2011 – 87.8%


14. Ontario youth feel safe at home, at school, online and in their communities.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who have a happy home life

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009/10 – 76.9%; 2013/14 – 77.3%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of youth (aged 11–15) who agreed or strongly agreed with the statement "I have a happy home life."

Source: This data is based on responses to the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. The self-reported survey is administered every four years by the Social Program Evaluation Group at Queen’ University on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) and is funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Sample: 5,949 students, in Grades 6–10, from 81 Ontario schools.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2009/10 – 76.9%; 2013/14 – 77.3%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who feel safe at school

Graphic of a bar graph showing  2009 – 93.8%; 2011 – 95.6%; 2013 – 95.7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported that they generally felt safe at school.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 – 93.8%; 2011 – 95.6%; 2013 – 95.7%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who have been bullied online

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2012/13 – 19%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported having been bullied over the Internet in the past 12 months.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2012/13 – 19%

Indicator: Proportion of Ontarians who feel safe in their communities

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2011 – 96.2%, 2012 – 95.8%, 2013 – 97%, 2015 – 98%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of respondents to the Provincial Community Satisfaction Survey who responded they feel "safe" or "very safe" in their community when asked "How safe do you feel in your community?"

Source: This data comes from the provincial component of the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Community Satisfaction Surveys (CSS). Data presented here is based on survey responses from the 2015 OPP Community Satisfaction Survey Provincial Report.

Sample: 1,005 Ontarians aged 16 and over, and who are from a household where no member of the household was employed by the OPP.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2011 – 96.2%, 2012 – 95.8%, 2013 – 97%, 2015 – 98%


15. Ontario youth respect, and are respected by, the law and justice system.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who participate in antisocial behaviour

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 – 10.4%; 2011 – 8%; 2013 – 7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of Ontario students (Grades 7–12) who reported at least three of the following nine antisocial behaviours in the 12 months before the survey: vandalized property, theft of goods worth less than $50, theft of goods worth $50 or more, stole a car/joyriding, break and entering, sold cannabis, ran away from home, assaulted someone (not a sibling), and carried a weapon.

Source: Data is based on self-reports from students who participated in the Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey. The survey is conducted every two years. Data presented here is derived from anonymous questionnaires completed in classrooms between November 2012 and June 2013.

Sample: For the 2013 survey, 10,272 students (63% of selected students in participating schools) in Grades 7–12 from 42 school boards, 198 schools and 671 classes in Ontario completed the survey. Students excluded from the sample include those enrolled in private schools or home-schooled, those institutionalized for correctional or health reasons, those schooled on native reserves, military bases or in the remote northern regions of Ontario.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2009 – 10.4%; 2011 – 8%; 2013 – 7%

Indicator: Ontario’s total youth crime rate

Graphic of a bar graph showing 3,201 per 100,000 youth: 2013 – 3,372; 2014 – 3,201

Definition: This indicator is the proportion of youth who were either charged by police or diverted from the formal criminal justice system through the use of warnings, cautions, referrals to community programs, etc. The proportion was calculated based on Criminal Code incidents excluding traffic offences, calculated on the basis of 100,000 youth aged 12–17 in the population. In 2014, the total youth crime rate (excluding traffic) was 3,201 per 100,000 youth aged 12–17 in the population, which is a combination of the rate of youth accused who were formally charged and the rate of youth accused who were diverted (1,449 and 1,753 per 100,000, respectively).

Please note: The previously published data for this indicator has been revised due to Statistics Canada annual updates from police services: In 2013, the total youth crime rate (excluding traffic offences) was 3,372 per 100,000 youth aged 12–17 in the population, which is a combination of the rate of youth accused who were formally charged and the rate of youth accused who were diverted (1,554 and 1,818 per 100,000 respectively).

Source: The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS), in cooperation with the policing community, collects police-reported crime statistics through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. This survey was designed to measure the incidence of crime in Canadian society and its characteristics.

Sample: The CCJS calculates crime rates for youth aged 12–17. Ontario youth who have been formally charged or diverted for non-traffic-related incidents in 2014 were included in this sample.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 3,201 per 100,000 youth: 2013 – 3,372; 2014 – 3,201

Indicator: Ontario’s total youth violent crime rate

Graphic of a bar graph showing 1,048 per 100,000 youth: 2014 – 1,048

Definition: This indicator is one of the sub-categories included in the total youth crime rate. It is the proportion of youth who were either charged by police or diverted from the formal criminal justice system through the use of warnings, cautions, referrals to community programs, etc. The proportion was calculated based on violent offences categories, calculated on the basis of 100,000 youth aged 12–17 in the population. In 2014, the violent youth crime rate was 1,048 per 100,000 youth aged 12–17 in the population, which is a combination of the rate of youth accused who were formally charged, and the rate of youth accused who were diverted (573 and 475 per 100,000, respectively).

Ontario’s total youth violent crime rate has been steadily decreasing. Over the past three years, the rate has dropped from 1,507* (2011), to 1,378* (2012), to 1,180* (2013).

*Proportion calculated on the basis of 100,000 youth aged 12–17 in the population.

Source: The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS), in cooperation with the policing community, collects police-reported crime statistics through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. This survey was designed to measure the incidence of crime in Canadian society and its characteristics.

Sample: The CCJS calculates crime rates for youth aged 12–17. Ontario youth who have been formally charged or diverted for violent offences in 2014 were included in this sample.

Desired Direction: Down

Actual Direction: New indicator.

Data: 1,048 per 100,000 youth: 2014 – 1,048

Indicator: Proportion of youth who believe officers in their local police force do a good job at treating people fairly

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2009 – 53.6%

Definition: Respondents were asked if they believed officers in their local police force did "a good job," "an average job," or "a poor job" of treating people fairly. This indicator is defined as the proportion of respondents who indicated they felt police officers in their local police force did a good job in this respect.

Source: Data is obtained from the 2009 Statistics Canada General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 23. The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. Data collection was conducted from February 2–November 30, 2009. Respondents from Ontario were isolated for the purposes of this analysis, though the GSS uses a representative sample of all Canadians. All respondents were interviewed by telephone. Households without telephones were therefore excluded. There is evidence, however, that persons living in such households represent approximately 0.9% of the target population (Residential Telephone Services Survey [RTSS] 2008). As interviews were not conducted by cellular telephone, persons with only cellular telephone service were also excluded. The 2008 RTSS reported that 8% of households in Canada have cellular telephone service only.

Sample: While the GSS uses a national sample of respondents aged 15 and older, for the purposes of this analysis respondents aged 15–24 from Ontario were isolated. This resulted in a total sample of 519 respondents.

Data: 2009 – 53.6%


Civic Engagement and Youth Leadership

16. Ontario youth play a role in informing the decisions that affect them.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who voted in the last (2011) federal election

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2008 – 34.1%; 2011 – 38.2%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of votes cast by youth aged 18–24 divided by the number of registered electors aged 18–24.

Source: Data is based on Elections Canada administrative data obtained from the National Register of Electors. Data represents voting activity in the 2011 and 2008 federal elections for youth aged 18–24 registered to vote in Ontario. The estimates of voter turnout by age group have margins of error between three and nine percentage points at the provincial or territorial level, for almost all age groups. Actual participation rates should be within the associated margin of error for the estimates 19 times out of 20.

Sample: The 2011 data represents 438,444 voters of the 1,148,575 registered electors in Ontario aged 18–24.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2008 – 34.1%; 2011 – 38.2%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who volunteer as a member of a board or committee

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009 – 10.6%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of Ontario youth aged 15–24 that volunteer as a member of a board or committee.

Source: Data is obtained from the 2013 Statistics Canada General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 27: Giving, Volunteering and Participating, variable FV_040 (Formal Volunteering).

Sample: While the GSS uses a national sample of respondents aged 15 and older, for the purposes of this analysis respondents aged 15–24 from Ontario were isolated. This resulted in a total sample of 251 respondents.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement indicator.

Data: 2009 – 10.6%


17. Ontario youth are engaged in their communities.

Indicator: Youth donor rate

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 65%

Definition: The indicator is defined at the number of Ontario youth aged 15–24 who donated to an organization.

Source: Data is obtained from the 2013 Statistics Canada General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 27: Giving, Volunteering and Participating.

Sample: While the GSS uses a national sample of respondents aged 15 and older, for the purposes of this analysis respondents aged 15–24 from Ontario were isolated. This resulted in a total sample of 251 respondents.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement indicator.

Data: 2013 – 65%

Indicator: Youth volunteer rate

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 69.3%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of youth aged 15–24 that volunteered in Ontario.

Source: Data is obtained from the 2013 Statistics Canada General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 27: Giving, Volunteering and Participating.

Sample: While the GSS uses a national sample of respondents aged 15 and older, for the purposes of this analysis respondents aged 15–24 from Ontario were isolated. This resulted in a total sample of 251 respondents.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Replacement indicator.

Data: 2013 – 69.3%


18. Ontario youth leverage their assets to address social issues.

Indicator: Proportion of youth who volunteered to support a group or organization

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 - 16.7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of Ontario youth aged 15–24 that provided unpaid time to support a group or organization.

Source: Data is obtained from the 2013 Statistics General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 27: Giving, Volunteering and Participating, variable FV_160 (Formal Volunteering). The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians provide unpaid hours of work to support their community.

Sample: While the GSS uses a national sample of respondents aged 15 and older, for the purposes of this analysis respondents aged 15–24 from Ontario were isolated. This resulted in a total sample of 251 respondents.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: New indicator.

Data: 2013 - 16.7%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who volunteered in activities to protect the environment

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 - 10.4%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of Ontario youth aged 15–24 that provided unpaid time to support activities to protect the environment.

Source: Data is obtained from the 2013 Statistics Canada General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 27: Giving, Volunteering and Participating, variable FV_150 (Formal Volunteering). The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians provide unpaid hours of work to support their community.

Sample: While the GSS uses a national sample of respondents aged 15 and older, for the purposes of this analysis respondents aged 15–24 from Ontario were isolated. This resulted in a total sample of 251 respondents.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: New indicator.

Data: 2013 - 10.4%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who participated in activities to support a political party or group

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 - 3.3%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the number of Ontario youth aged 15–24 that participated in activities to support a political party or group.

Source: Data is obtained from the 2013 Statistics Canada General Social Survey (GSS), Cycle 27: Giving, Volunteering and Participating, variable CER_120. The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians provide unpaid hours of work to support their community.

Sample: While the GSS uses a national sample of respondents aged 15 and older, for the purposes of this analysis respondents aged 15–24 from Ontario were isolated. This resulted in a total sample of 242 respondents.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: New indicator.

Data: 2013 - 3.3%


Coordinated and Youth Friendly Communities

19. Ontario youth have access to safe spaces that provide quality opportunities for play and recreation.

Indicator: Proportion of parents who feel recreation opportunities in their community meet their child’s needs

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2000 – 60%; 2005 – 57%; 2010 – 62%

Definition: Proportion of parents with children aged 5–17 who responded that the public facilities and programs for physical activity in their community meet the needs of their child "quite well" or "very well."

Source: Data is based on responses to a national, random-digit dialing telephone survey, Physical Activity Monitor (PAM) or a representative sample conducted annually over a 12-month period from April to March. PAM was developed by the Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute. Data presented here is based on data collected between April 2010 and March 2011.

Sample: 984 Ontario parents of children and youth aged 5–17 responded to the 2010 PAM.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2000 – 60%; 2005 – 57%; 2010 – 62%

Indicator: Proportion of youth who feel there are good places in their community to spend their free time

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2009/10 – 67.2%; 2014 – 75.7%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of youth (aged 11–15) who agreed or strongly agreed with the statement "There are good places to spend your free time (e.g., recreation centres, parks, shopping centres)."

Source: This data is based on responses to the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study. The self-reported survey is administered every four years by the Social Program Evaluation Group at Queen’s University on behalf of the World Health Organization (WHO) and is funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Sample: 5,949 students, in Grades 6–10, from 81 Ontario schools.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Up

Data: 2009/10 – 67.2%; 2014 – 75.7%


20. Ontario youth know about and easily navigate resources in their communities.

Indicator: Proportion of students who use social media to find information about news, health issues, or relationships

Graphic of a pie chart showing 2013 – 78%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of children and youth who use the Internet to find information about news, health issues, or relationships.

Source: This data is based on the 2013 report Young Canadians in a Wired World, Phase III: Life Online. This series of reports provides a snapshot of what children and youth are doing and thinking to get a better understanding of how digital technologies affect their daily lives.

Sample: In 2013, 5,436 Canadian students in Grades 4–11 were surveyed.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: No new data.

Data: 2013 – 78%

Indicator: Proportion of callers to 211 looking for community referrals who are young people

Graphic of a bar graph showing 2013 – 14%; 2014 – 10%

Definition: This indicator is defined as the proportion of callers to the 211 community referral service who are aged 25 or younger.

Source: This data is based on administrative data collected annually by 211 operators.

Sample: Data is based on 51,103 calls to 211 in 2014, by individuals aged 0–35.

Desired Direction: Up

Actual Direction: Down

Data: 2013 – 14%; 2014 – 10%

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